Remove generated doc files from git
authorSteve McIntyre <steve@einval.com>
Thu, 31 Oct 2019 18:13:17 +0000 (18:13 +0000)
committerSteve McIntyre <steve@einval.com>
Thu, 31 Oct 2019 18:13:17 +0000 (18:13 +0000)
doc/debian-jigdo-mini-howto.html [deleted file]
doc/jigdo-file.1 [deleted file]
doc/jigdo-file.html [deleted file]
doc/jigdo-lite.1 [deleted file]
doc/jigdo-lite.html [deleted file]
doc/jigdo-mirror.1 [deleted file]
doc/jigdo-mirror.html [deleted file]
doc/jigdo.1 [deleted file]
doc/jigdo.html [deleted file]

diff --git a/doc/debian-jigdo-mini-howto.html b/doc/debian-jigdo-mini-howto.html
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 0610aac..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,1148 +0,0 @@
-<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01
-Transitional//EN""http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/loose.dtd">
-<HTML>
- <HEAD>
-  <TITLE>Debian Jigdo mini-HOWTO</TITLE><META NAME="GENERATOR"
-  CONTENT="Modular DocBook HTML Stylesheet Version 1.79"></HEAD>
- <BODY CLASS="ARTICLE" BGCOLOR="#FFFFFF" TEXT="#000000" LINK="#0000FF"
-  VLINK="#840084" ALINK="#0000FF">
-  <DIV>
-   <DIV>
-    <H1><A NAME="AEN2">Debian Jigdo mini-HOWTO</A></H1>
-    <H3><A NAME="AEN5">Peter Jay Salzman</A></H3>
-    <DIV>
-     <DIV>
-      <P><CODE>&#60;<A HREF="mailto:p@dirac.orgZZZ">p@dirac.orgZZZ</A
-       >&#62;</CODE></P></DIV></DIV>
-    <P>Copyright &copy; 2001 Peter Jay Salzman</P>
-    <P>2005-12-05 ver 1.8<BR></P>
-    <DIV>
-     <DIV><A NAME="AEN21"></A>
-      <P><B>Abstract</B></P>
-      <P>Getting Debian ISOs has always been a painful, slow and supremely
-       inefficient process. Jigdo is a tool for distributing and obtaining
-       Debian ISOs in an easy, fast and very efficient manner. This HOWTO
-       describes why you should use jigdo, a little bit about how it works
-       and how you use it to get and update Debian ISOs.</P>
-      <P>Jigdo is a very general tool, and isn't tied specifically to
-       Debian ISOs. The jigdo tools can be used to make any ISO available
-       for download in the same easy, fast and efficient manner they're
-       used for Debian ISOs. This HOWTO will cover this as well, but we'll
-       focus primarily on downloading Debian ISOs.</P></DIV></DIV><HR
-    ></DIV>
-   <DIV>
-    <DL>
-     <DT><B>Table of Contents</B></DT>
-     <DT>1. <A HREF="#ADMINISTRATA">Administrata</A></DT>
-     <DD>
-      <DL>
-       <DT>1.1. <A HREF="#AUTHORSHIP">Authorship and Copyright</A></DT>
-       <DT>1.2. <A HREF="#ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS">Acknowledgements</A></DT>
-       <DT>1.3. <A HREF="#AEN48">Comments and Corrections</A></DT>
-       <DT>1.4. <A HREF="#VERSION">Latest Version And Translations</A></DT
-       ></DL></DD>
-     <DT>2. <A HREF="#WHYJIGDO">Why jigdo?</A></DT>
-     <DD>
-      <DL>
-       <DT>2.1. <A HREF="#AEN97">How Does One Get A Debian ISO Image
-        Set?</A></DT>
-       <DT>2.2. <A HREF="#WHYNOTDOWNLOADTHEWHOLEISOIMAGE">Why Not Download
-        The Whole ISO Image?</A></DT>
-       <DT>2.3. <A HREF="#WHATISJIGDO">What Is Jigdo?</A></DT></DL></DD>
-     <DT>3. <A HREF="#HOWJIGDOWORKS">How Jigdo Works (optional)</A></DT>
-     <DD>
-      <DL>
-       <DT>3.1. <A HREF="#PREPARINGTHEISOFORDOWNLOAD">Preparing The ISO For
-        Download</A></DT>
-       <DT>3.2. <A HREF="#THE.TEMPLATEFILE">The .template File</A></DT>
-       <DT>3.3. <A HREF="#THE.JIGDOFILE">The .jigdo File</A></DT>
-       <DT>3.4. <A HREF="#DOWNLOADINGTHEIMAGE">Downloading The Image</A
-        ></DT></DL></DD>
-     <DT>4. <A HREF="#DOWNLOADINGYOURFIRSTIMAGE">Downloading Your First
-      Image (In 5 Easy Steps)</A></DT>
-     <DD>
-      <DL>
-       <DT>4.1. <A HREF="#AEN208">Install Jigdo</A></DT>
-       <DT>4.2. <A HREF="#DOWNLOADTHE.TEMPLATEAND.JIGDOFILES">Download The
-        .template And .jigdo Files</A></DT>
-       <DT>4.3. <A HREF="#RUNJIGDO-LITE">Run jigdo-lite</A></DT>
-       <DT>4.4. <A HREF="#SPECIFYAMIRROR">Specify A Mirror</A></DT>
-       <DT>4.5. <A HREF="#DOWNLOADINGOFTHEISO">Downloading Of The ISO</A
-        ></DT></DL></DD>
-     <DT>5. <A HREF="#UPDATINGYOURIMAGE">Updating Your Image</A></DT>
-     <DT>6. <A HREF="#FAQ">Frequently Asked Questions</A></DT>
-     <DD>
-      <DL>
-       <DT>6.1. <A HREF="#AEN351">Why does jidgo ask <SPAN><I>twice</I
-        ></SPAN> for scanning for existing files? Is it enough to say yes
-        once ?</A></DT>
-       <DT>6.2. <A HREF="#AEN357">Jigdo Has Problems Downloading Certain
-        Filenames.</A></DT>
-       <DT>6.3. <A HREF="#USEPROXY">How do I make jigdo use my proxy?</A
-        ></DT>
-       <DT>6.4. <A HREF="#AEN384">Jigdo-lite fails with an error - have I
-        downloaded all those MBs in vain?</A></DT>
-       <DT>6.5. <A HREF="#DISACKNOWLEDGEMENTS">[11 Aug 2002]: Why aren't
-        the translations of this HOWTO on LDP?</A></DT>
-       <DT>6.6. <A HREF="#INTERRUPTED">What do I do if my jigdo download
-        gets interrupted?</A></DT>
-       <DT>6.7. <A HREF="#AEN433">My jigdo download won't complete because
-        the .jigdo file is broken. When I download a new, fixed .jigdo
-        file, do I need to download all the data over again?</A></DT>
-       <DT>6.8. <A HREF="#DVDSIZEDIMAGES">Can I use jigdo to download
-        images for DVD?</A></DT>
-       <DT>6.9. <A HREF="#AEN450">Can I burn the <TT>.iso.tmp</TT> file to
-        CD?</A></DT>
-       <DT>6.10. <A HREF="#AEN457">Jigdo-lite is broken! It downloads
-        packages and deletes them. I know it doesn't write them to the <TT
-        >iso.tmp</TT> file because the file size doesn't change!</A></DT>
-       <DT>6.11. <A HREF="#TROUBLEWITHJIGDOEASY">I'm having trouble getting
-        jigdo-easy to work.</A></DT>
-       <DT>6.12. <A HREF="#SCANMULTIPLEIMAGES">For image updates, I want
-        jigdo-lite to scan 14 loop-mounted images in one go. How can I do
-        this?</A></DT>
-       <DT>6.13. <A HREF="#WGETOPTIONS">Jigdo-lite is too verbose. How can
-        I supress some or all of its messages?</A></DT>
-       <DT>6.14. <A HREF="#OTHERPLATFORMS">Can I use jigdo on platforms
-        other than Linux?</A></DT>
-       <DT>6.15. <A HREF="#AEN500">On MS Windows, why do I get a "<TT>No
-        such file or directory</TT>" error message?</A></DT>
-       <DT>6.16. <A HREF="#AEN506">On MS Windows, why won't my image grow
-        larger than 2GB?</A></DT>
-       <DT>6.17. <A HREF="#AEN511">On MS Windows, <TT>jigdo-lite.bat</TT>
-        fails with an error message saying "sh" was not found.</A></DT>
-       <DT>6.18. <A HREF="#AEN524">Can I run multiple instances of
-        jigdo-lite to download images in parallel?</A></DT>
-       <DT>6.19. <A HREF="#AEN529">Is there a GUI interface available?</A
-        ></DT></DL></DD>
-     <DT>7. <A HREF="#ERRATA">Errata</A></DT>
-     <DD>
-      <DL>
-       <DT>7.1. <A HREF="#JIGDO-EASY">jigdo-easy</A></DT>
-       <DT>7.2. <A HREF="#MORE-ABOUT-SCAN">More About Scan Sources</A></DT
-       >
-       <DT>7.3. <A HREF="#JIGDO-FILE-CACHE">jigdo-file-cache.db</A></DT>
-       <DT>7.4. <A HREF="#LINKS">Resources</A></DT></DL></DD></DL></DIV>
-   <DIV>
-    <H2><A NAME="ADMINISTRATA">1. Administrata</A></H2>
-    <DIV>
-     <H3><A NAME="AUTHORSHIP">1.1. Authorship and Copyright</A></H3>
-     <P>This document is copyright (c) 2001 Peter Jay Salzman, <CODE
-      >&#60;<A HREF="mailto:p@dirac.orgZZZ"><A HREF="mailto:p@dirac.orgZZZ"
-      TARGET="_top">p@dirac.orgZZZ</A></A>&#62;</CODE>. Permission is
-      granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the
-      terms of the Open Software License (OSL), version 1.1. I hate HOWTO's
-      that include the license; it's a tree killer. You can read the OSL at
-      <A HREF="http://opensource.org/licenses/osl-1.1.txt" TARGET="_top"
-      >http://opensource.org/licenses/osl-1.1.txt</A>.</P>
-     <P>If you want to create a derivative work or publish this HOWTO for
-      commercial purposes, I'd appreciate it if you contact me first. This
-      will give me a chance to give you the most recent version. I'd also
-      appreciate either a copy of whatever it is you're doing or a spinach,
-      garlic, mushroom, feta cheese and artichoke heart pizza.</P></DIV>
-    <DIV><HR>
-     <H3><A NAME="ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS">1.2. Acknowledgements</A></H3>
-     <P>I would like to thank the author of jigdo, <A
-      HREF="mailto:atterer@debian.org" TARGET="_top">Richard Atterer</A>,
-      simply for writing jigdo. Anyone who has obtained Debian ISOs by
-      other means will know why. This HOWTO started out as some webpages I
-      wrote about my experience with jigdo. Richard took the time to email
-      me extensive corrections, clarifications and answers to questions I
-      had about jigdo. Since then, he has read my work many times. Richard
-      is a developer who not only cares about his work, but also about the
-      people who use it. Sadly, this is becoming less common in this busy
-      world we live in. Thanks, Richard!</P>
-     <P>I'd also like to thank <A HREF="mailto:cnw@conradwood.netZZZ"
-      TARGET="_top">Conrad Wood</A>, Elcio Mello, <A
-      HREF="mailto:mramos@montevideo.com.uyZZZ" TARGET="_top">Marcelo
-      Ramos</A>, Yufeng Wang, Tsukasa Yamaguchi, <A
-      HREF="mailto:kozlov.y@gmail.comZZZ" TARGET="_top">Yuri Kozlov</A>,
-      and <A HREF="mailto:oguzy@comu.edu.trZZZ" TARGET="_top">Oguz
-      Yarimtepe</A> for translating this mini-HOWTO into languages other
-      than English. I feel totally honored that they have found my words
-      worthy of their time and effort. Thanks, guys!</P>
-     <P>Lastly, I'd like to thank <A
-      HREF="mailto:mark@panic.et.tudelft.nlZZZ" TARGET="_top">Mark van
-      Lent</A>, Gordon Huff, David Anselmi, <A
-      HREF="mailto:thierry.cabuzel@skynet.beZZZ" TARGET="_top">Thierry
-      Cabuzel</A>, <A HREF="mailto:rlharris@hal-pc.orgZZZ" TARGET="_top"
-      >Russell L. Harris</A>, and <A HREF="mailto:tux-master@web.deZZZ"
-      TARGET="_top">Jens Seidel</A> for kind words and corrections.</P
-     ></DIV>
-    <DIV><HR>
-     <H3><A NAME="AEN48">1.3. Comments and Corrections</A></H3>
-     <P>I care a great deal about the people who use this document. Even
-      mini-HOWTOs take a long time to write, and I wouldn't have invested
-      so much effort into something people don't understand. If you have
-      comments, corrections or suggestions, even in matters like writing
-      style, don't hesitate to email me. As long as I'm not totally swamped
-      by my PhD dissertation and the book I'm writing on debugging code
-      with GDB/DDD for No Starch Press, I'll do my best to respond to each
-      email I receive about this mini-HOWTO. News flash: I've completed my
-      Ph.D.; now I'm swamped with job hunting. Does anyone need to hire a
-      theoretical physicist?</P></DIV>
-    <DIV><HR>
-     <H3><A NAME="VERSION">1.4. Latest Version And Translations</A></H3>
-     <P></P>
-     <DIV>
-      <DL>
-       <DT>German:</DT>
-       <DD>
-        <P>Conrad Wood <CODE>&#60;<A HREF="mailto:cnw@conradwood.netZZZ"
-         >cnw@conradwood.netZZZ</A>&#62;</CODE>.</P></DD>
-       <DT>Portuguese</DT>
-       <DD>
-        <P>Elcio Mello.</P></DD>
-       <DT>Spanish</DT>
-       <DD>
-        <P>Marcelo Ramos <CODE>&#60;<A
-         HREF="mailto:mramos@montevideo.com.uyZZZ"
-         >mramos@montevideo.com.uyZZZ</A>&#62;</CODE>.</P></DD>
-       <DT>Chinese</DT>
-       <DD>
-        <P>Yufeng Wang</P></DD>
-       <DT>Japanese</DT>
-       <DD>
-        <P>Tsukasa Yamaguchi. Available at <A
-         HREF="http://www.linux.or.jp/JF/JFdocs/Debian-Jigdo" TARGET="_top"
-         >http://www.linux.or.jp/JF/JFdocs/Debian-Jigdo</A>.</P></DD>
-       <DT>Russian</DT>
-       <DD>
-        <P>Yuri Kozlov <CODE>&#60;<A HREF="mailto:kozlov.y@gmail.comZZZ"
-         >kozlov.y@gmail.comZZZ</A>&#62;</CODE>. Available at <A
-         HREF="http://alioth.debian.org/project/showfiles.php?group_id=30279"
-         TARGET="_top"
-         >http://alioth.debian.org/project/showfiles.php?group_id=30279</A
-         >.</P></DD>
-       <DT>Turkish</DT>
-       <DD>
-        <P>Oguz Yarimtepe <CODE>&#60;<A HREF="mailto:oguzy@comu.edu.trZZZ"
-         >oguzy@comu.edu.trZZZ</A>&#62;</CODE>. Available at <A
-         HREF="http://docs.comu.edu.tr/howto/debian-jidgo.html"
-         TARGET="_top">http://docs.comu.edu.tr/howto/debian-jigdo.html</A
-         >.</P></DD></DL></DIV>
-     <P>In addition to the URLs given above, all the translations (as well
-      as the English version) are available at my website: <A
-      HREF="http://www.dirac.org/linux/debian/jigdo" TARGET="_top"
-      >http://www.dirac.org/linux/debian/jigdo</A>. If you'd like to
-      translate this mini-HOWTO to another language, please contact me at
-      <CODE>&#60;<A HREF="mailto:p@dirac.orgZZZ"><A
-      HREF="mailto:p@dirac.orgZZZ" TARGET="_top">p@dirac.orgZZZ</A></A
-      >&#62;</CODE>.</P>
-     <P>The English version of this HOWTO can also be found at The Linux
-      Documentation Project: <A HREF="http://tldp.org/docs.html"
-      TARGET="_top">http://tldp.org/docs.html</A>.</P></DIV></DIV>
-   <DIV><HR>
-    <H2><A NAME="WHYJIGDO">2. Why jigdo?</A></H2>
-    <DIV>
-     <H3><A NAME="AEN97">2.1. How Does One Get A Debian ISO Image Set?</A
-      ></H3>
-     <P>If you want a set of Debian CDs there are many ways of getting
-      them. One way is to buy them from <A
-      HREF="http://www.debian.org/CD/vendors/" TARGET="_top">vendors</A>
-      who sell Debian CDs. This definitely has merit since some of the
-      vendors donate money back to the Debian project. Your donations help
-      make sure that Debian is around for a long time.</P>
-     <P>Another way of getting a set of Debian CDs is to burn your own set.
-      This first entails obtaining an ISO image and then burning that ISO
-      image to a blank CD. Before jigdo, there were two ways of creating
-      Debian CDs:</P>
-     <P></P><OL TYPE="1"><LI>
-     <P>Downloading the entire ISO</P></LI><LI>
-     <P>Using the pseudo-image kit (PIK)</P></LI></OL>
-     <P>This document is about the newer and better way of obtaining Debian
-      ISO images, using a tool called jigdo. In fact, the PIK is now
-      officially dead and all further references to it have been removed
-      from this document. The canonical method of getting Debian ISO images
-      is with jigdo.</P></DIV>
-    <DIV><HR>
-     <H3><A NAME="WHYNOTDOWNLOADTHEWHOLEISOIMAGE">2.2. Why Not Download The
-      Whole ISO Image?</A></H3>
-     <P>There are mirrors which offer http and ftp downloads of Debian
-      ISOs. The problem is that there are very few mirror sites, and their
-      bandwidth can't support everyone who wants Debian ISOs. For example,
-      fsn.hu has reportedly saturated the connection of its provider. The
-      outgoing traffic reaches a few terabytes per month!</P>
-     <P>In addition, Debian testing and unstable get updated often. Your
-      ISOs may become outdated the same day you download them unless you
-      find some sneaky way of updating them like mounting the ISO on a
-      loopback device and using rsync (which is what the PIK did). So if
-      you want up-to-date ISO images, you must download a new set of ISO
-      images every day. Clearly, this is not the way you want to obtain
-      Debian ISOs!</P>
-     <P>Even if you want to download the stable ISO images, they still get
-      updated every few months. Downloading the ISO images will give you
-      up-to-date images for a few months, but every time a new revision of
-      Debian stable is released, you'll need to go through the painful
-      process of downloading the entire ISO set from scratch. This is not a
-      good use of your time and the mirror's resources.</P></DIV>
-    <DIV><HR>
-     <H3><A NAME="WHATISJIGDO">2.3. What Is Jigdo?</A></H3>
-     <P>Jigdo (which stands for "Jigsaw Download") was written by <A
-      HREF="mailto:atterer@debian.org" TARGET="_top">Richard Atterer</A>
-      and is released under the GNU GPL. It's a tool that allows efficient
-      downloading and updating of an ISO image. Any ISO image. Jigdo is not
-      Debian specific, however Debian has chosen it to be the official
-      method of downloading ISO images.</P>
-     <P>A common misconception is that jigdo creates ISO images; it
-      doesn't. Let's discuss the overall process of how jigdo allows you to
-      obtain an ISO image. Let Adam (a Debian release manager) be the
-      person offering the ISO image. Let Betty (a Debian user) be the
-      person who wants to download the ISO image.</P>
-     <P></P><OL TYPE="1"><LI>
-     <P>Adam first creates an ISO image suitable for burning a CD. He might
-      use a utility like <SPAN>mkisofs</SPAN> or <SPAN>debian-cd</SPAN> to
-      create the ISO image. He also creates two small files associated with
-      his newly created image: a <TT>.jigdo</TT> file and a <TT
-      >.template</TT> file. He makes these two files available for download
-      to anyone who wants to obtain his ISO image.</P></LI><LI>
-     <P>Betty then downloads the <TT>.jigdo</TT> and <TT>.template</TT>
-      files. She uses <SPAN>jigdo-lite</SPAN> along with these two files to
-      download Adam's ISO image.</P></LI><LI>
-     <P>When Debian gets updated, Adam creates a new version of the ISO and
-      generates new <TT>.jigdo</TT> and <TT>.template</TT> files.</P></LI
-     ><LI>
-     <P>When Betty wants to update her CDs, she downloads the new <TT
-      >.jigdo</TT> and <TT>.template</TT> files and uses them with <SPAN
-      >jigdo-light</SPAN> to update her copy of the ISO images. The
-      important thing here is that she only downloads the differences
-      between her old ISO and Adam's new ISO. She does not have to
-      re-download the parts that are unchanged.</P></LI></OL>
-     <P>Jigdo comes with two utilities: <SPAN>jigdo-file</SPAN> (used by
-      Adam) which creates the <TT>.jigdo</TT> and <TT>.template</TT> files,
-      and <SPAN>jigdo-lite</SPAN> (used by Betty) which uses these two
-      files to download or update the ISO. If all you want to do is
-      obtain/update Debian ISOs, you'll only use <SPAN>jigdo-lite</SPAN>.
-      You can forget that jigdo-file even exists. &nbsp; :-)</P>
-     <P>Jigdo addresses all the problems with the other methods of
-      obtaining Debian ISO images:</P>
-     <P></P><UL><LI>
-     <P>It's much faster than downloading the entire ISO image.</P></LI
-     ><LI>
-     <P>Unlike downloading the entire ISO image, it can take an outdated CD
-      (or a loop mounted outdated ISO image), download <SPAN><I>only</I
-      ></SPAN> the files that have changed since the CD (or ISO image) was
-      created and create a new updated ISO. Very similar to how you use cvs
-      to update source code.</P></LI><LI>
-     <P>jigdo-lite uses wget which, by default, uses http to transfer
-      files. Unlike rsync, http is never blocked by firewalls (except the
-      ones behind which you shouldn't be using jigdo to begin with).</P
-     ></LI><LI>
-     <P>Jigdo is very kind to the bandwidth of the servers offering the
-      Debian images. The Debian mirrors can handle a bigger load of people
-      using jigdo to download Debian images than with other methods of
-      getting them.</P></LI></UL>
-     <P>Clearly, jigdo is the best method of obtaining Debian ISO
-      images.</P></DIV></DIV>
-   <DIV><HR>
-    <H2><A NAME="HOWJIGDOWORKS">3. How Jigdo Works (optional)</A></H2>
-    <P>You don't need to know this material to download Debian ISOs, but it
-     may help demystify how jigdo works. If you're not interested in the
-     details, simply fast forward to <A HREF="#DOWNLOADINGYOURFIRSTIMAGE"
-     >Section 4</A>, "How Do I Use Jigdo".</P>
-    <DIV><HR>
-     <H3><A NAME="PREPARINGTHEISOFORDOWNLOAD">3.1. Preparing The ISO For
-      Download</A></H3>
-     <P>A CD image is a filesystem called iso9660, but for this discussion,
-      we can safely talk about a CD image as being a big file called an
-      "ISO image" (about 650MB) that contains files at various offsets. For
-      instance, if a CD contains a 567 byte file named README, the ISO
-      image might contain the README file's contents between offsets
-      20480000 and 20480567. You can visualize a CD image as:</P><PRE>                    --------------------------------------------------------
-      ISO Image:    |xxxx| file-0 |xx| file-1 |xxx| file-2 |x| file-3 |xxxx|
-                    --------------------------------------------------------
-      </PRE>
-     <P>The "x" areas of the image contain things like directory
-      information, zero padding, disk name, boot block, etc.</P>
-     <P><SPAN>jigdo-file</SPAN> takes two things as input: the complete CD
-      image (so the ISO already needs to have been made) and a set of files
-      which may or may not be in the image. Here's a visualization of
-      jigdo-file's input:</P><PRE>                    --------------------------------------------------------
-      ISO Image:    |xxxx| file-0 |xx| file-1 |xxx| file-2 |x| file-3 |xxxx|
-                    --------------------------------------------------------
-
-                         ----------  ----------              ----------    ----------
-      Loose Files:       | file-0 |  | file-1 |              | file-3 |    | file-4 |
-                         ----------  ----------              ----------    ----------
-      </PRE>
-     <P>Through magic, jigdo-file finds out which of the loose files are
-      contained in the ISO image and their offsets within the ISO file. It
-      outputs two files: a ".template" file and a ".jigdo" file.</P></DIV>
-    <DIV><HR>
-     <H3><A NAME="THE.TEMPLATEFILE">3.2. The .template File</A></H3>
-     <P>Given an input of an ISO image and a set of files which may or may
-      not be in the ISO image, jigdo-file outputs a .template file for that
-      ISO image. Here's what the <TT>.template</TT> file looks like:</P><PRE>                    --------------------------------------------------------
-      .template:    |xxxx| md5-0  |xx| md5-1  |xxx|cccccccc|x| md5-3  |xxxx|
-                    --------------------------------------------------------
-      </PRE>
-     <P>jigdo-file found that the files <TT>file-0</TT>, <TT>file-1</TT>
-      and <TT>file-3</TT> were contained in the ISO image. It removed the
-      contents of the these files and replaced them with each file's md5
-      checksum (the <TT>md5-0</TT>, <TT>md5-1</TT>, etc).</P>
-     <P>The "<TT>x</TT>" data (directory information, zero padding, etc)
-      within the ISO image is compressed and written to the .template file.
-      Finally, any files within the ISO image that weren't supplied as
-      loose files (like <TT>file-2</TT>) are also compressed and written to
-      the .template file. This is shown as "<TT>c</TT>" data in the
-      .template file visualization.</P>
-     <P>Loose files which were supplied to <SPAN>jigdo-file</SPAN> that
-      aren't found in the ISO image (like <TT>file-4</TT>) are ignored.</P
-     ></DIV>
-    <DIV><HR>
-     <H3><A NAME="THE.JIGDOFILE">3.3. The .jigdo File</A></H3>
-     <P>Given an input of an ISO image and a set of loose files which may
-      or may not be in the ISO image, jigdo-file outputs a .jigdo file for
-      that ISO image. The Debian .jigdo files are gzipped, so you need to
-      use zcat or zless to view them. Here's what a .jigdo file looks like
-      when you gunzip it:</P><PRE>      md5-0=http://somemirror.org/file-0
-      md5-1=http://somemirror.org/file-1
-      md5-2=http://somemirror.org/file-2
-      md5-3=http://somemirror.org/file-3
-      </PRE>
-     <P>The .jigdo file simply provides a mapping between the md5sum of a
-      file within the ISO image and the download URL of that file. There
-      are some other things within the <TT>.jigdo</TT> file, and if you
-      look through it, you'll see the <TT>.jigdo</TT> file has the same
-      format as a ".ini" file. It should be self explanatory, but if you
-      want the nitty-gritty details, see the jigdo documentation.</P>
-     <P>The format shown above is not quite what you'd see in a typical
-      .jigdo file, but it's very similar. If you look at the [Servers]
-      section at the bottom of the .jigdo file, you'll see exactly what the
-      difference is between what I showed above and an actual <TT
-      >.jigdo</TT> file.</P></DIV>
-    <DIV><HR>
-     <H3><A NAME="DOWNLOADINGTHEIMAGE">3.4. Downloading The Image</A></H3>
-     <P>Once you use <SPAN>jigdo-file</SPAN> to generate a <TT>.jigdo</TT>
-      and .<TT>template</TT> file for an ISO image, anyone can use <SPAN
-      >jigdo-lite</SPAN> to download that image. jigdo-lite downloads all
-      the files of a Debian ISO using <SPAN>wget</SPAN>, assembles them and
-      forms a copy of the original ISO image on the fly.</P></DIV></DIV>
-   <DIV><HR>
-    <H2><A NAME="DOWNLOADINGYOURFIRSTIMAGE">4. Downloading Your First Image
-     (In 5 Easy Steps)</A></H2>
-    <P>We'll assume that you're starting from scratch and don't have any
-     Debian ISOs on hand. Once you burn your set of ISOs, you can use
-     jigdo-lite later to update them. We'll cover updating your ISOs in the
-     next section.</P>
-    <DIV><HR>
-     <H3><A NAME="AEN208">4.1. Install Jigdo</A></H3>
-     <P>First install the jigdo-file package:</P><PRE>      # apt-get install jigdo-file
-      </PRE>
-     <P>Jigdo is under aggressive development. Bug fixes and enhancements
-      are constant, so if you're using stable or testing, download
-      jigdo-file from unstable at <A
-      HREF="http://packages.debian.org/unstable/utils/jigdo-file.html"
-      TARGET="_top"
-      >http://packages.debian.org/unstable/utils/jigdo-file.html</A>. As of
-      28 Nov 2005 it's at version 0.7.2-2.</P></DIV>
-    <DIV><HR>
-     <H3><A NAME="DOWNLOADTHE.TEMPLATEAND.JIGDOFILES">4.2. Download The
-      .template And .jigdo Files</A></H3>
-     <P>For each ISO image you want to download, you'll need both the
-      .jigdo and .template file for that image. Both files follow the same
-      naming convention:</P><PRE>      distro-arch-n.jigdo
-      distro-arch-n.template
-      </PRE>
-     <P>where distro is the name of the distro (like "sarge"), arch is the
-      architecture (like "i386") and n is the disk number (like "1").</P>
-     <P>For example, sarge has 8 images, so you need to download 8 .jigdo
-      files and 8 .template files. They can be downloaded from <A
-      HREF="http://www.debian.org/CD/jigdo-cd/" TARGET="_top"
-      >http://www.debian.org/CD/jigdo-cd/</A>. The first .jigdo and
-      .template file are named <TT>sarge-i386-1.jigdo</TT> and <TT
-      >sarge-i386-1.template</TT> respectively.</P></DIV>
-    <DIV><HR>
-     <H3><A NAME="RUNJIGDO-LITE">4.3. Run jigdo-lite</A></H3>
-     <P>Run <SPAN>jigdo-lite</SPAN> and give it the <TT>.jigdo</TT> file of
-      the image you want to download. Using Sarge as an example:</P><PRE>      lucifer$ ls
-      sarge-i386-1.jigdo  sarge-i386-1.template
-      lucifer$ jigdo-lite sarge-i386-1.jigdo 
-      
-      Jigsaw Download "lite"
-      Copyright 2001-2003 by Richard Atterer &lt;jigdo@atterer.org&gt;
-      Getting mirror information from /etc/apt/sources.list
-      
-      -----------------------------------------------------------------
-      Images offered by `sarge-i386-1.jigdo':
-        1: 'Debian GNU/Linux testing "Sarge"
-               - Official Snapshot i386 Binary-1 CD' (sarge-i386-1.iso)
-      
-      Further information about `sarge-i386-1.iso':
-      Generated on Fri, 7 Feb 2003 20:31:28 -0700
-      
-      -----------------------------------------------------------------
-      If you already have a previous version of the CD you are
-      downloading, jigdo can re-use files on the old CD that are also
-      present in the new image, and you do not need to download them
-      again. Mount the old CD ROM and enter the path it is mounted under
-      (e.g. `/mnt/cdrom').
-      Alternatively, just press enter if you want to start downloading
-      the remaining files.
-      Files to scan:
-      </PRE>
-     <P>If you suspended <SPAN>jigdo-lite</SPAN> with <B>control</B>+<B
-      >z</B> (don't do this; I'll tell you what you'd see) and looked at
-      the output of <B>ls</B>, you'd find a new file in the directory named
-      <TT>sarge-i386-1.jigdo.unpacked</TT>. It turns out that .jigdo files
-      are gzip'ed. This file is simply a gunzip'ed version of the <TT
-      >.jigdo</TT> file.</P>
-     <P>Right now, <SPAN>jigdo-lite</SPAN> is telling us that if we have an
-      outdated version of first CD of sarge, we should give the pathname to
-      the CD. This is how you update your ISO images (or complete your
-      incomplete downloads). Since we're assuming that you're starting from
-      scratch and have no Debian ISOs yet, we have nothing to scan. We'll
-      cover this in <A HREF="#UPDATINGYOURIMAGE">Section 5</A>, so just
-      press <B>ENTER</B>.</P>
-     <P>See also <A HREF="#MORE-ABOUT-SCAN">Section 7.2</A>, "More About
-      Scan Sources".</P></DIV>
-    <DIV><HR>
-     <H3><A NAME="SPECIFYAMIRROR">4.4. Specify A Mirror</A></H3>
-     <P>You'll see:</P><PRE>      -----------------------------------------------------------------
-      The jigdo file refers to files stored on Debian mirrors. Please
-      choose a Debian mirror as follows: Either enter a complete URL
-      pointing to a mirror (in the form
-      `ftp://ftp.debian.org/debian/'), or enter any regular expression
-      for searching through the list of mirrors: Try a two-letter
-      country code such as `de', or a country name like `United
-      States', or a server name like `sunsite'.
-      Debian mirror [http://linux.csua.berkeley.edu/debian/]: 
-                       </PRE>
-     <P>By default, <SPAN>jigdo-lite</SPAN> pulls the mirror from your <TT
-      >/etc/apt/sources.list</TT>. If you want to use a different mirror,
-      you would specify a different mirror here. If this is the mirror you
-      want to use, press <B>ENTER</B>. Jigdo-lite will then write a <TT
-      >.jigdo-lite</TT> file in your home directory.</P>
-     <P>Next, if the <TT>.jigdo</TT> file you're using references a package
-      which needs to be downloaded from a Non-US server, <SPAN
-      >jigdo-lite</SPAN> will prompt you for a Debian Non-US mirror. The
-      message displayed (and your response) will be very similar to the
-      mirror dialog in the previous paragraph.</P><PRE>      -----------------------------------------------------------------
-      The jigdo file also refers to the Non-US section of the Debian
-      archive. Please repeat the mirror selection for Non-US. Do not
-      simply copy the URL you entered above; this does not work because
-      the path on the servers differs!
-      Debian non-US mirror [http://linux.csua.berkeley.edu/debian-non-US//]: 
-                       </PRE>
-     <P>Jigdo-lite will write your choice to <TT>~/.jigdo-lite</TT>.
-      However, if the image you're about to download doesn't contain Non-US
-      software you won't see this dialog.</P>
-     <P>If you want to change the default mirrors you use with jigdo at any
-      time in the future, you can modify these two lines in <TT
-      >~/.jigdo-lite</TT>:</P><PRE>      debianMirror='http://some-mirror-to-use/debian/'
-      nonusMirror='http://some-other-mirror/debian-non-US/'
-      </PRE></DIV>
-    <DIV><HR>
-     <H3><A NAME="DOWNLOADINGOFTHEISO">4.5. Downloading Of The ISO</A></H3
-     >
-     <P>After you specify the mirror(s), <SPAN>jigdo-lite</SPAN> will begin
-      downloading files to assemble the ISO image:</P><PRE>      Not downloading .template file - `sarge-i386-1.template' already present
-      
-      -----------------------------------------------------------------
-      Merging parts from `file:' URIs, if any...
-      Found 0 of the 826 files required by the template
-      Will not create image or temporary file - try again with different input files
-      --09:35:12--  http://mirror/debian/pool/main/p/pack/pack_3.10-1_i386.deb
-          =&#62; `sarge-i386-1.iso.tmpdir/mirror/debian/pool/main/p/pack/pack_3.10-1_i386.deb
-      Resolving linux.csua.berkeley.edu... done.
-      Connecting to linux.csua.berkeley.edu[128.32.112.231]:80... connected.
-      HTTP request sent, awaiting response... 200 OK
-      Length: 1,911,624 [application/x-debian-package]
-      
-      19% [======&#62;                              ] 378,304      149.87K/s    ETA 00:09
-      </PRE>
-     <P>There'll be a lot of messages flying across your screen; if this is
-      confusing to you, see <A HREF="#WGETOPTIONS">Section 6.13</A>. While
-      jigdo-lite is downloading the packages, switch to another console (or
-      open another xterm) and do an <B>ls</B> in the directory you're
-      running jigdo-lite in. Now there should be 6 files in the
-      directory:</P>
-     <P></P><UL><LI>
-     <P><TT>sarge-i386-1.iso.list</TT></P></LI><LI>
-     <P><TT>sarge-i386-1.iso.tmp</TT></P></LI><LI>
-     <P><TT>jigdo-file-cache.db</TT></P></LI><LI>
-     <P><TT>sarge-i386-1.iso.tmpdir/</TT></P></LI><LI>
-     <P><TT>sarge-i386-1.jigdo</TT></P></LI><LI>
-     <P><TT>sarge-i386-1.jigdo.unpacked</TT></P></LI><LI>
-     <P><TT>sarge-i386-1.template</TT></P></LI></UL>
-     <P>The <TT>sarge-i386-1.iso.tmpdir/</TT> directory contains all the
-      Debian packages that <SPAN>jigdo-lite</SPAN> downloads. Every so
-      often, the directory gets flushed and the files get written to <TT
-      >sarge-i386-1.iso.tmp</TT>, which is an temporarily incomplete
-      version of the ISO image you want. Note that <TT
-      >sarge-i386-1.iso.tmp</TT> won't appear until the first time <TT
-      >sarge-i386-1.iso.tmpdir/</TT> gets flushed.</P>
-     <P><TT>jigdo-file-cache.db</TT> is a Berekeley DB file containing
-      md5sums of any files read in when you specify a directory at the <TT
-      >Files to scan:</TT> prompt. It's described in <A
-      HREF="#JIGDO-FILE-CACHE">Section 7.3</A>.</P>
-     <P>At this point, go play some Quake III because this will take some
-      time (you may want to play on a different machine because jigdo is
-      very disk intensive when it flushes files to the <TT>.iso.tmp</TT>
-      file). At some point, the download will finish and you'll be staring
-      at:</P><PRE>      FINISHED --13:32:58--
-      Downloaded: 7,469,872 bytes in 9 files
-      Found 9 of the 9 files required by the template                              
-      Successfully created `sarge-i386-3.raw'
-      
-      -----------------------------------------------------------------
-      Finished!
-      The fact that you got this far is a strong indication that `sarge-i386-3.raw'
-      was generated correctly. I will perform an additional, final check,
-      which you can interrupt safely with Ctrl-C if you do not want to wait.
-      
-      OK: Checksums match, image is good!   
-                       </PRE></DIV></DIV>
-   <DIV><HR>
-    <H2><A NAME="UPDATINGYOURIMAGE">5. Updating Your Image</A></H2>
-    <P>Presumably, you've read the last section, followed the instructions,
-     burned your newly created ISO files onto CD and are feeling warm and
-     fuzzy. Sooner or later, some packages will get updated and now you
-     want to donate your old CDs to some newbie at your local LUG's
-     installfest and burn yourself a set of updated CDs. Since you're well
-     on the way to becoming a jigdo-guru, we won't go into as much painful
-     detail as we did in the last section.</P>
-    <P>The first step is to download the .jigdo and .template files, again,
-     for the images you want to update. You may wonder why you need to
-     download them a second time. The reason is because the updated image
-     you want to download has changed. Files may have been added or
-     deleted, but even if not, any updated packages or files will have a
-     different checksum from the checksum listed in the .jigdo and
-     .template files you used when you first downloaded the images.</P>
-    <P>At this point, you're either holding an outdated Debian CD in your
-     hand or you have the CD's outdated ISO image on your hard drive. Let's
-     go through the steps of getting an updated ISO file. If you have a CD,
-     put it in your CD drive and mount it:</P><PRE>      $ mount /cdrom
-       </PRE>
-    <P>On the other hand, if you have an ISO file you'd like to update,
-     mount it as a loop device (you may need to be root to do this). Using
-     Woody as an example:</P><PRE>      # mount -o loop woody-i386-1.iso /mnt
-       </PRE>
-    <P>Now run <SPAN>jigdo-lite</SPAN> with the <TT>.jigdo</TT> file as an
-     argument.</P><PRE>      $ jigdo-lite woody-i386-1.jigdo 
-      
-      -----------------------------------------------------------------
-      Jigsaw Download "lite"
-      Copyright 2001-2002 by Richard Atterer &lt;jigdo@atterer.org&gt;
-      Loading settings from `/home/p/.jigdo-lite'
-      
-      -----------------------------------------------------------------
-      Images offered by `woody-i386-1.jigdo':
-        1: Debian GNU/Linux 3.0 r0 Woody
-             - Official i386 Binary-1 CD (debian-30r0-i386-binary-1.iso)
-      
-      Further information about `debian-30r0-i386-binary-1.iso':
-      Generated on Thu, 18 Jul 2002 14:34:12 +0100
-      
-      -----------------------------------------------------------------
-      If you already have a previous version of the CD you are
-      downloading, jigdo can re-use files on the old CD that are also
-      present on the new image, and you do not need to download them
-      again.  You found the secret message; you're a very careful
-      reader.  Mount the old CD ROM and enter the path it is mounted
-      under (e.g. `/mnt/cdrom'). Alternatively, just press enter if you
-      want to start the download of any remaining files.
-      
-      You can also enter a single digit from the list below to
-      select the respective entry for scanning:
-        1: /mnt
-      Files to scan:
-       </PRE>
-    <P>jigdo-lite is asking us to give it the location of your mounted CD
-     (if you're updating a CD) or your loop mounted ISO file (if you're
-     using the ISO file). I'm using an ISO file loop mounted on <TT
-     >/mnt</TT>, so I'll enter <TT>/mnt</TT>. If you're updating a CD,
-     enter the mount directory of your CD, which is most likely <TT
-     >/cdrom</TT>. In either case, <SPAN>jigdo-lite</SPAN> will scan the
-     directory of your mounted media, determine which files need updating
-     and re-use the files which don't need updating. See also <A
-     HREF="#MORE-ABOUT-SCAN">Section 7.2</A>, "More About Scan Sources".</P
-    >
-    <P>You may see something like:</P><PRE>      Files to scan: /mnt/other
-      
-      Not downloading .template file - `woody-i386-1.template' already present
-      jigdo-file: Output file `debian-30r0-i386-binary-1.iso' already exists - delete
-      it or use --force
-      jigdo-file failed with code 3 - aborting.
-       </PRE>
-    <P>What happened? Actually, I wanted to show you this because you'll
-     bump into it sooner or later. I'm updating an ISO file, but the
-     outdated image file is in the same directory I'm working in.
-     Jigdo-lite wants to generate a file called <TT>woody-i386-1.iso</TT>
-     but there's already a file by that name in the current directory (the
-     outdated image). Jigdo-lite doesn't want to destroy that file, so it
-     bails and lets me know that I can either delete that file or use <TT
-     >--force</TT> to overwrite the file. You could also rename or move the
-     file too, but I guess <SPAN>jigdo-lite</SPAN> assumes we already know
-     this. &nbsp; :-)</P>
-    <P>Don't be timid about moving or renaming the image file just because
-     it's loop mounted. The filesystem uses inodes under the hood, and even
-     if you move or rename the file, the inode stays the same. You won't
-     hurt the filesystem mounted under <TT>/mnt</TT>. As for deleting the
-     ISO file, that won't hurt the mounted filesystem either. A file's
-     inode gets deallocated only when the inode's reference count drops to
-     zero. Mounting the ISO image bumps the reference count up, so the file
-     really gets deleted only after you <B>rm</B> the file <SPAN><I>and</I
-     ></SPAN> umount the loop device. All you people who are updating the
-     CD don't have to worry about any of this. :-)</P>
-    <P>I'll rename the ISO file to <TT>woody-i386-1.iso.old</TT> and run
-     <SPAN>jigdo-lite</SPAN> again. Let's try again:</P><PRE>      $ jigdo-lite woody-i386-1.jigdo
-      
-      -----------------------------------------------------------------
-      Jigsaw Download "lite"
-      Copyright 2001-2002 by Richard Atterer &lt;jigdo@atterer.org&gt;
-      Loading settings from `/home/p/.jigdo-lite'
-      
-      -----------------------------------------------------------------
-      Images offered by `woody-i386-1.jigdo':
-        1: Debian GNU/Linux 3.0 r0 Woody - Official i386 Binary-1 CD
-             (debian-30r0-i386-binary-1.iso)
-
-      Further information about `debian-30r0-i386-binary-1.iso':
-      Generated on Thu, 18 Jul 2002 14:34:12 +0100
-      
-      -----------------------------------------------------------------
-      If you already have a previous version of the image you are
-      downloading, jigdo can re-use files on the old image that are also
-      present on the new image, and you do not need to download them
-      again. Mount the old CD ROM and enter the path it is mounted under
-      (e.g. `/mnt/cdrom'). Alternatively, just press enter if you want
-      to start the download of any remaining files.
-      You can also enter a single digit from the list below to
-      select the respective entry for scanning:
-        1: /mnt
-      Files to scan: /mnt
-      Not downloading .template file - `woody-i386-1.template' already present
-      ...
-      Found 1200 of the 1224 files required by the template                          
-      ...</PRE>
-    <P>jigdo-lite remembers that I wanted to scan <TT>/mnt</TT> and tells
-     me I can either type <TT>1</TT> to scan that directory or type the
-     directory in again. Since I'm a perverse person, I type the name of
-     the directory again.</P>
-    <P>The ellipsis represent some text that changes rapidly. The first
-     ellipsis is a dynamic list of what files jigdo-lite is scanning. The
-     second ellipses denotes progress in writing <TT
-     >woody-i386-1.iso.tmp</TT>. Once jigdo-lite finishes scanning the
-     files and writing the temporary ISO file, it prints:</P><PRE>      Copied input files to temporary file `woody-i386-1.iso.tmp'
-         - repeat command and supply more files to continue
-      
-      -----------------------------------------------------------------
-      If you already have a previous version of the image you are
-      downloading, jigdo can re-use files on the old image that are also
-      present on the new image, and you do not need to download them
-      again. Mount the old CD ROM and enter the path it is mounted under
-      (e.g. `/mnt/cdrom'). Alternatively, just press enter if you want
-      to start the download of any remaining files.
-      You can also enter a single digit from the list below to
-      select the respective entry for scanning:
-        1: /mnt
-      Files to scan: 
-       </PRE>
-    <P>Since you normally don't have another source of files to scan other
-     than your loop mounted ISO file (or your CD), press <B>ENTER</B>.
-     Jigdo-lite will then ask you about which mirrors you want to use, just
-     like it did when you downloaded your ISO for the first time. You've
-     already answered these questions before, but if you truly don't
-     remember, you might want to re-read <A HREF="#SPECIFYAMIRROR">Section
-     4.4</A>.</P>
-    <P>At this point, you'll see <SPAN>jigdo-lite</SPAN> working its magic.
-     Now wasn't that easy?</P></DIV>
-   <DIV><HR>
-    <H2><A NAME="FAQ">6. Frequently Asked Questions</A></H2>
-    <P>Questions prepended with a date indicate a time sensitive question
-     (a question that relates to a temporary situation). If you see one of
-     these questions and know that the temporary situation has changed,
-     please <A HREF="mailto:p@dirac.orgZZZ" TARGET="_top">contact me</A>
-     and let me know so I can remove the question from the mini-HOWTO.</P>
-    <DIV><HR>
-     <H3><A NAME="AEN351">6.1. Why does jidgo ask <SPAN><I>twice</I></SPAN
-      > for scanning for existing files? Is it enough to say yes once ?</A
-      ></H3>
-     <P>It keeps asking this as long as you enter a path to scan. The idea
-      is that you may want to scan several old CDs, so you can insert one
-      after the other into the drive and keep supplying the path "<TT
-      >D:\</TT>" (or whatever). See also <A HREF="#MORE-ABOUT-SCAN"
-      >Section 7.2</A>, "More About Scan Sources".</P></DIV>
-    <DIV><HR>
-     <H3><A NAME="AEN357">6.2. Jigdo Has Problems Downloading Certain
-      Filenames.</A></H3>
-     <P>When downloading Debian images under Windows, jigdo-lite may appear
-      to have trouble downloading one or more of the following files:</P><PRE>      libbusiness-onlinepayment-bankofamerica-perl_xxx_all.deb
-      libbusiness-onlinepayment-authorizenet-perl_xxx_all.deb
-      libbusiness-onlinepayment-payconnect-perl_xxx_all.deb
-      libmasonx-request-withapachesession-perl_xxx_all.deb
-      libtemplate-plugin-calendar-simple-perl_xxx_all.deb
-      </PRE>
-     <P>Move the jigdo download directory up by as many directories as
-      possible, closer to the drives's root directory.</P>
-     <P>The NTFS filesystem has a 255 character limit on a file's pathname.
-      When jigdo-lite downloads files from the internet, it makes a copy of
-      the server directory structure in its download directory. With their
-      very long names, the above Debian packages may exceed the allowed
-      path length, which leads to error messages like "<TT>Cannot write to
-      `[very long pathname]' (No such file or directory)</TT>".</P>
-     <P>Some people may now wonder: Why does jigdo-lite use wget's "<TT
-      >--force-directories</TT>" switch, which creates these problematic
-      directory hierarchies?</P>
-     <P>Early versions of jigdo-lite did not use it, but then some folks
-      requested that jigdo-lite always use the "<TT>--continue</TT>" switch
-      to avoid half-downloaded .deb files being ignored and deleted when
-      you interrupt and restart jigdo-lite.</P>
-     <P>Unfortunately, it turned out that this led to problems: The Debian
-      servers contained several identically named files (e.g. "<TT
-      >root.bin</TT>") in different directories, and if you interrupted
-      jigdo-lite at roughly the right time during the download, the chances
-      were high that the resumed download would append data to the wrong
-      half-downloaded file, corrupting it and making the entire jigdo
-      download fail.</P></DIV>
-    <DIV><HR>
-     <H3><A NAME="USEPROXY">6.3. How do I make jigdo use my proxy?</A></H3
-     >
-     <P>Edit <TT>~/.jigdo-lite</TT> (or <TT>jigdo-lite-settings.txt</TT>
-      for the Microsoft Windows version) into a text editor and find the
-      line that starts with "<TT>wgetOpts</TT>". The following switches can
-      be added to that line:</P><PRE>      -e ftp_proxy=http://LOCAL-PROXY:PORT/
-      -e http_proxy=http://LOCAL-PROXY:PORT/
-      --proxy-user=USER
-      --proxy-passwd=PASSWORD
-      </PRE>
-     <P>Of course, substitute the correct values for your proxy server. The
-      last two options are only necessary if your proxy uses password
-      authentication. The switches need to be added to the end of the
-      wgetOpts line before the final <TT>'</TT> character. All options must
-      be on one line.</P>
-     <P>Alternatively, under Linux you can also set up the <CODE
-      >ftp_proxy</CODE> and <CODE>http_proxy</CODE> environment variables,
-      for example in the file <TT>/etc/environment</TT> or <TT
-      >~/.bashrc</TT>.</P></DIV>
-    <DIV><HR>
-     <H3><A NAME="AEN384">6.4. Jigdo-lite fails with an error - have I
-      downloaded all those MBs in vain?</A></H3>
-     <P>If <SPAN>jigdo-file</SPAN> aborts after downloading a considerable
-      chunk of the ISO contents, you'll have a large "<TT>.iso.tmp</TT>"
-      file. There are several things to try to salvage your download:</P>
-     <P></P><UL><LI>
-     <P>Restart the download by pressing <B>RETURN</B>. Maybe some of the
-      files could not be downloaded because of timeouts or other transient
-      errors. Try to download the missing files again.</P></LI><LI>
-     <P>Try a different mirror. Some Debian mirrors are slightly out of
-      sync -- maybe a different mirror still holds files that were deleted
-      from the one you specified, or it has already been updated with files
-      that are not yet present on your mirror. This has happened quite a
-      few times with me.</P></LI><LI>
-     <P>Retrieve the missing parts of the image using <A
-      HREF="http://rsync.samba.org" TARGET="_top">rsync</A>. First, you
-      need to find out the correct rsync URL of the image you are
-      downloading: Choose a server that offers rsync access to the <A
-      HREF="http://www.debian.org/CD/mirroring/rsync-mirrors" TARGET="_top"
-      >stable</A> or <A HREF="http://www.debian.org/CD/http-ftp/#testing"
-      TARGET="_top">testing</A> images, then determine the correct path and
-      filename. Directory listings can be obtained with commands like <B
-      >rsync rsync://cdimage.debian.org/debian-cd/</B>.</P>
-     <P>Next, remove the "<TT>.tmp</TT>" extension from jigdo-lite's
-      temporary file by renaming it, and pass both the remote URL and the
-      local filename to rsync: <B>rsync
-      rsync://server.org/path/binary-i386-1.iso binary-i386-1.iso</B> You
-      may want to use rsync's <TT>--verbose</TT> and <TT>--progress</TT>
-      switches to get status messages, and <TT>--block-size=8192</TT> to
-      increase its speed.</P></LI><LI>
-     <P>Under Linux, you can loop-mount the <TT>.tmp</TT> file to access
-      the packages that were already downloaded, and reuse them for
-      generating an image from a newer .jigdo file. To do this, first issue
-      the following commands as root in the directory with the broken
-      download: <B>mkdir mnt; mount -t iso9660 -o loop *.tmp mnt</B>. Next,
-      start a new download in a different directory, and enter the path of
-      the mnt directory at the "Files to scan" prompt.</P>
-     <P>Under Microsoft Windows you can do the same thing by loop mounting
-      the temporary ISO image using "virtual drive" software. <SPAN><A
-      HREF="http://www.daemon-tools.cc" TARGET="_top">Daemon tools</A
-      ></SPAN> and <SPAN>Nero Image Drive</SPAN> are both very popular. See
-      also <A HREF="http://tinyurl.com/c39zr" TARGET="_top"
-      >http://tinyurl.com/c39zr</A> for more options.</P></LI></UL></DIV>
-    <DIV><HR>
-     <H3><A NAME="DISACKNOWLEDGEMENTS">6.5. [11 Aug 2002]: Why aren't the
-      translations of this HOWTO on LDP?</A></H3>
-     <P>I've been having trouble getting the translations of this HOWTO
-      submitted to the non-English LDP editors.</P>
-     <P>The German LDP editor, Marco Budde <CODE>&#60;<A
-      HREF="mailto:Budde@tu-harburg.de">Budde@tu-harburg.de</A>&#62;</CODE
-      > refuses to accept the German translation because it was written in
-      Docbook and not Linuxdoc, even though Docbook is the preferred SGML
-      language for the LDP. It's a shame that we have people within the
-      open source community who would sabotage our community from the
-      inside.</P>
-     <P>The Portuguese LDP editor, Alfredo Carvalho <CODE>&#60;<A
-      HREF="mailto:ajpc@poli.org">ajpc@poli.org</A>&#62;</CODE>, has
-      completely ignored my submission of the Portuguese translation.</P>
-     <P>If you care about having LDP documents in these languages, I urge
-      you to write to these editors and ask them to please be more
-      responsible about accepting translated documents. For the time being,
-      you can download these translations from my personal website, <A
-      HREF="http://www.dirac.org/linux/debian/jigdo" TARGET="_top"
-      >http://www.dirac.org/linux/debian/jigdo</A>.</P>
-     <P>Shame on you, Marco Budde <CODE>&#60;<A
-      HREF="mailto:Budde@tu-harburg.de">Budde@tu-harburg.de</A>&#62;</CODE
-      >.</P>
-     <P>Shame on you, Alfredo Carvalho <CODE>&#60;<A
-      HREF="mailto:ajpc@poli.org">ajpc@poli.org</A>&#62;</CODE>.</P></DIV>
-    <DIV><HR>
-     <H3><A NAME="INTERRUPTED">6.6. What do I do if my jigdo download gets
-      interrupted?</A></H3>
-     <P>If your download gets interrupted, all you need to do is restart
-      jigdo-lite and hit <B>ENTER</B> at all the question prompts.
-      Jigdo-lite will pick up where it left off.</P></DIV>
-    <DIV><HR>
-     <H3><A NAME="AEN433">6.7. My jigdo download won't complete because the
-      .jigdo file is broken. When I download a new, fixed .jigdo file, do I
-      need to download all the data over again?</A></H3>
-     <P>You may find that the .jigdo file you downloaded is broken. It's
-      uncommon, but it does happen from time to time with moving targets
-      like Debian testing or unstable.</P>
-     <P>If you find that <TT>.jigdo</TT> is broken, you'll need to download
-      a new .jigdo file (when a fixed one becomes available), but you <SPAN
-      ><I>won't</I></SPAN> need to download all the ISO data again.</P>
-     <P>You can use the same loop mounting trick we use when updating an
-      ISO image. The difference is that there's no finished .iso file to
-      start with, but the .iso.tmp file is an ISO image too and can be used
-      to finish the download without having to re-download all the data
-      that was downloaded before the broken .jigdo file caused jigdo-lite
-      to halt. Simply loop mount the .iso.tmp file on <TT>/mnt</TT> and
-      when you re-run jigdo-lite with the fixed .jigdo file, tell
-      jigdo-lite to scan <TT>/mnt</TT>. Don't forget to rename or move the
-      .iso.tmp file so it doesn't interfere with jigdo-lite which will want
-      to create a new .iso.tmp file.</P></DIV>
-    <DIV><HR>
-     <H3><A NAME="DVDSIZEDIMAGES">6.8. Can I use jigdo to download images
-      for DVD?</A></H3>
-     <P>Absolutely; the process is identical to downloading CD images. The
-      only thing you need to do differently is to download the .jigdo and
-      .template files for DVDs instead of CDs. You can find the DVD .jigdo
-      and .template files at <A HREF="http://www.debian.org/CD/jigdo-cd/"
-      TARGET="_top">http://www.debian.org/CD/jigdo-cd/</A>.</P>
-     <P>On Linux, you need kernel 2.4 or later to create DVD-sized
-      files.</P>
-     <P>Under MS Windows, you need to use <TT>jigdo-win-0.7.1a</TT>
-      (released 21 July 2004) or later to create DVD-sized images. This is
-      because of a bug in the large file support of Mingw32, the compiler
-      used to create the MS Windows executables. The bug got fixed on this
-      date, and <TT>jigdo-win-0.7.1a</TT> was released.</P></DIV>
-    <DIV><HR>
-     <H3><A NAME="AEN450">6.9. Can I burn the <TT>.iso.tmp</TT> file to
-      CD?</A></H3>
-     <P>Thanks to Gordon Huff and David Anselmi, we now know the answer is
-      "yes you can". But more importantly, Gordon gave a good reason why
-      you'd want to do this in the first place. Paraphrasing Gordon:</P><A
-     NAME="AEN454"></A><BLOCKQUOTE>
-     <P>My friend's Win98 has a *nice* cable connection. I arrive in the
-      morning, start jigdo (more than one, actually) and then we go to the
-      store, tie back the kiwi plant, put up the Christmas lights and
-      Christmas tree, trim the tree, order and split a pizza and fire up
-      the satellite dish.</P>
-     <P>I leave my friends place with several iso.tmp's on CDRWs. When I
-      get home, I use the iso's that didn't finish to update my jigdo setup
-      at home which is a dial-up.</P></BLOCKQUOTE></DIV>
-    <DIV><HR>
-     <H3><A NAME="AEN457">6.10. Jigdo-lite is broken! It downloads packages
-      and deletes them. I know it doesn't write them to the <TT
-      >iso.tmp</TT> file because the file size doesn't change!</A></H3>
-     <P>Jigdo works just fine -- the <TT>.iso.tmp</TT> file is created at
-      the beginning with its final size, but filled with zero bytes. Later,
-      parts of it are overwritten with the downloaded data.</P>
-     <P>You can tell that jigdo is making progress by looking at the
-      messages "<TT>Found X of the Y files required by the template</TT>"
-      that are printed from time to time. The first value "<TT>X</TT>"
-      should increase. When <TT>X</TT> equals <TT>Y</TT>, the download is
-      finished.</P></DIV>
-    <DIV><HR>
-     <H3><A NAME="TROUBLEWITHJIGDOEASY">6.11. I'm having trouble getting
-      jigdo-easy to work.</A></H3>
-     <P>See <A HREF="#JIGDO-EASY">Section 7.1</A>.</P></DIV>
-    <DIV><HR>
-     <H3><A NAME="SCANMULTIPLEIMAGES">6.12. For image updates, I want
-      jigdo-lite to scan 14 loop-mounted images in one go. How can I do
-      this?</A></H3>
-     <P>When updating CD images, it's tiresome to keep loop-mounting and
-      unmounting images. However, by default the Linux kernel only supports
-      eight loop devices, and jigdo-lite's menu of previously entered paths
-      only has five entries.</P>
-     <P>To scan many loop-mounted images, you must first tell the Linux
-      kernel to support more than the default eight devices. This is done
-      by giving the "<TT>max_loop</TT>" parameter to the module when
-      loading it, e.g. with "<TT>modprobe loop max_loop=16</TT>" on the
-      command line or by adding the line "<TT>options loop max_loop=16</TT
-      >" to <TT>/etc/modules.conf</TT>. In Debian, you must put this line
-      into a file named e.g. <TT>/etc/modutils/local-loop</TT> and then run
-      <B>update-modules</B> because direct changes to <TT
-      >/etc/modules.conf</TT> will be overwritten.</P>
-     <P>Having mounted the individual images, you can pass the parent
-      directory of their mount points to jigdo-lite for scanning. For
-      example, if the images are mounted under <TT
-      >/mnt/myloopmounts/image1/</TT> etc., pass "<TT
-      >/mnt/myloopmounts</TT>" as the path to scan. If passing the parent
-      directory is inconvenient, you can also create a directory and fill
-      it with symlinks to the mount points.</P></DIV>
-    <DIV><HR>
-     <H3><A NAME="WGETOPTIONS">6.13. Jigdo-lite is too verbose. How can I
-      supress some or all of its messages?</A></H3>
-     <P>Jigdo-lite uses wget, and wget's output can be quite verbose. If
-      this is unsettling, you can make wget more quiet by adding <TT
-      >--non-verbose</TT> to the <TT>wgetOpts</TT> switch in your <TT
-      >~/.jigdo-lite</TT> file. If you want wget to print no messages at
-      all, use <TT>--quiet</TT> in the <TT>wgetOpts</TT> switch.</P></DIV>
-    <DIV><HR>
-     <H3><A NAME="OTHERPLATFORMS">6.14. Can I use jigdo on platforms other
-      than Linux?</A></H3>
-     <P>Certainly. If you're interested in Potato or Woody under Microsoft
-      Windows, old SunOS, HP-UX and IRIX you can use jigdo-easy. See <A
-      HREF="#JIGDO-EASY">Section 7.1</A> and <A HREF="#LINKS">Section
-      7.4</A>.</P>
-     <P>If you want to download Potato, Woody, Sarge or Sid under Microsoft
-      Windows, jigdo-lite has been ported to that platform and can be
-      downloaded from the main jigdo site (<A HREF="#LINKS">Section 7.4</A
-      >).</P></DIV>
-    <DIV><HR>
-     <H3><A NAME="AEN500">6.15. On MS Windows, why do I get a "<TT>No such
-      file or directory</TT>" error message?</A></H3>
-     <P>You might find that under MS Windows, jigdo-lite will download some
-      files but then fail to read their contents, which will produce a "<TT
-      >No such file or directory</TT>" error message. </P>
-     <P>It seems that this occurs if the length of the filenames that jigdo
-      processes exceeds a certain limit. The solution is to move the
-      half-finished download up in the directory hierarchy, closer to the
-      top-level directory of the drive.</P></DIV>
-    <DIV><HR>
-     <H3><A NAME="AEN506">6.16. On MS Windows, why won't my image grow
-      larger than 2GB?</A></H3>
-     <P>You're using an old version of jigdo. Please upgrade to <TT
-      >jigdo-win-0.7.1a </TT> or newer. See <A HREF="#DVDSIZEDIMAGES"
-      >Section 6.8</A>.</P></DIV>
-    <DIV><HR>
-     <H3><A NAME="AEN511">6.17. On MS Windows, <TT>jigdo-lite.bat</TT>
-      fails with an error message saying "sh" was not found.</A></H3>
-     <P>This means that the <TT>PATH</TT> command in the <TT>.bat</TT> file
-      failed. For some reason, this is the case if you unpacked jigdo on a
-      Windows network share using a path like "<TT
-      >\\SomeServer\Files\jigdo</TT>". Solution: Use "<B>Map network
-      drive</B>" (in the explorer "tools" menu) to assign a drive letter
-      like "<TT>Z:</TT>", then double-click on the <TT>.bat</TT> file
-      inside "<TT>Z:\jigdo</TT>". Alternatively, a workaround is to move
-      everything in the <TT>jigdo-bin</TT> subdirectory up to where the <TT
-      >.bat</TT> file is.</P></DIV>
-    <DIV><HR>
-     <H3><A NAME="AEN524">6.18. Can I run multiple instances of jigdo-lite
-      to download images in parallel?</A></H3>
-     <P>Absolutely. However, to avoid filename clashing, you should run
-      each <SPAN>jigdo-lite</SPAN> instance in its own separate directory.
-      You can start as many instances as you want, go to bed, and when you
-      wake up, all the ISO images will be waiting for you on your hard
-      drive. Be aware that <SPAN>jigdo-lite</SPAN> is bandwidth and CPU
-      intensive, so you won't want to use your computer with multiple
-      instances running in tandem.</P></DIV>
-    <DIV><HR>
-     <H3><A NAME="AEN529">6.19. Is there a GUI interface available?</A
-      ></H3>
-     <P>A GTK+ interface to jigdo is being worked on. Both Linux and
-      Microsoft Windows GUI clients are planned. Unfortunately, it's been
-      80% done for over 1.5 years, so don't hold your breath for its
-      release.</P></DIV></DIV>
-   <DIV><HR>
-    <H2><A NAME="ERRATA">7. Errata</A></H2>
-    <DIV>
-     <H3><A NAME="JIGDO-EASY">7.1. jigdo-easy</A></H3>
-     <P>Jigdo-easy, by Anne Bezemer, is a fork of <SPAN>jigdo-lite</SPAN>
-      which is portable to a wider range of systems, including Microsoft
-      Windows, old SunOS, HP-UX and IRIX). It's also easier to use than
-      jigdo-lite but because of changes made to Jigdo, will only work with
-      Potato and Woody. Jigdo-easy will not be able to download Sarge and
-      Sid. See <A HREF="#LINKS">Section 7.4</A> and <A
-      HREF="#OTHERPLATFORMS">Section 6.14</A>.</P></DIV>
-    <DIV><HR>
-     <H3><A NAME="MORE-ABOUT-SCAN">7.2. More About Scan Sources</A></H3>
-     <P>By now you know that when <SPAN>jigdo-lite</SPAN> asks for files to
-      scan, you can use 3 sources:
-      <P></P><UL><LI STYLE="list-style-type: disc">
-      <P>A mounted copy of an outdated CD or DVD that you wish to
-       update.</P></LI><LI STYLE="list-style-type: disc">
-      <P>A loop-mounted copy of an outdated ISO image file on your hard
-       drive.</P></LI><LI STYLE="list-style-type: disc">
-      <P>A loop-mounted copy of the temporary <TT>.iso.tmp</TT> file, when
-       a previous <SPAN>jigdo-lite</SPAN> run aborted.</P></LI></UL> </P>
-     <P>As Jens Seidel points out, there is another, rather crafty, source
-      you should use for a scanning source: your apt cache. Apt uses the
-      directory <TT>/var/cache/apt/archives</TT> for cache. There will be
-      many Debian packages sitting in this directory, and they can be used
-      for a scan source for <SPAN>jigdo-lite</SPAN>! So when you're asked
-      for a directory to scan, by all means, use this directory too.</P>
-     <P>If you're editing the <TT>~/.jigdo-lite</TT> file by hand, be aware
-      that multiple scan directories are space separated, for example:</P><PRE>      scanMenu='/var/cache/apt/archives/ /cdrom/'
-      </PRE></DIV>
-    <DIV><HR>
-     <H3><A NAME="JIGDO-FILE-CACHE">7.3. jigdo-file-cache.db</A></H3>
-     <P>The cache contains the md5sums of files read when you supply a
-      directory at the <TT>Files to scan:</TT> prompt. If you have
-      jigdo-file scan the same directory a second time, the scan will be
-      very fast.</P>
-     <P>This could be useful in the following case: rev0 gets updated to
-      rev1. With the rev1 CD images, some packages may have been pushed
-      from CD <TT>n</TT> to CD <TT>n+1</TT>, or vice versa. If you had a
-      particularly slow link (e.g. modem), you'd try to avoid downloading
-      these packages again. For this reason, when downloading the new
-      version of CD <TT>n</TT>, you'd let jigdo-lite scan the three CDs <TT
-      >n-1</TT>, <TT>n</TT> and <TT>n+1</TT> (or even all 8 CDs if you want
-      to be 100% sure).</P>
-     <P>If you have jigdo-lite scan the same CDs over and over again while
-      updating each of the 8 CD images, the cache will prevent all the data
-      on the CDs from being read multiple times.</P>
-     <P>The cache is much more important when <SPAN><I>generating</I
-      ></SPAN> jigdo files, because you don't want jigdo-file to read in
-      your whole 50GB Debian mirror for every generated jigdo file.</P
-     ></DIV>
-    <DIV><HR>
-     <H3><A NAME="LINKS">7.4. Resources</A></H3>
-     <P>This HOWTO is winding down to a close, but I thought I'd leave you
-      with a few links and references to learn more about the jigdo tools
-      and how they work.</P>
-     <P></P>
-     <DIV>
-      <DL>
-       <DT><A HREF="http://atterer.org/jigdo" TARGET="_top"
-        >http://atterer.org/jigdo</A></DT>
-       <DD>
-        <P>This is the jigdo home site. You should definitely browse this
-         site; lots of information about ports, GUI clients and everything
-         under the sun relating to jigdo.</P></DD>
-       <DT><A HREF="http://cdimage.debian.org/~costar/jigdo" TARGET="_top"
-        >http://cdimage.debian.org/~costar/jigdo</A></DT>
-       <DD>
-        <P>The Debian page for jigdo-easy (<A HREF="#JIGDO-EASY">Section
-         7.1</A>).</P></DD>
-       <DT><A HREF="http://www.debian.org/CD/jigdo-cd" TARGET="_top"
-        >http://www.debian.org/CD/jigdo-cd</A></DT>
-       <DD>
-        <P>The main Debian page for jigdo.</P></DD>
-       <DT><A
-        HREF="http://packages.debian.org/testing/utils/jigdo-file.html"
-        TARGET="_top"
-        >http://packages.debian.org/testing/utils/jigdo-file.html</A></DT>
-       <DD>
-        <P>The official webpage for the Debian jigdo-file package.</P></DD
-       >
-       <DT><A HREF="http://lists.debian.org/search.html" TARGET="_top"
-        >http://lists.debian.org/search.html</A></DT>
-       <DD>
-        <P>You can use this page to search the debian-cd mailing list
-         archives.</P></DD>
-       <DT><A HREF="http://www.debian.org/MailingLists/subscribe"
-        TARGET="_top">http://www.debian.org/MailingLists/subscribe</A></DT
-       >
-       <DD>
-        <P>The subscription page for the debian-cd mailing list.</P></DD>
-       <DT><A HREF="https://lists.berlios.de/mailman/listinfo/jigdo-user"
-        TARGET="_top"
-        >https://lists.berlios.de/mailman/listinfo/jigdo-user</A></DT>
-       <DD>
-        <P>The subscription page for the official Jigdo mailing list.</P
-        ></DD></DL></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV>
- </BODY>
-</HTML>
diff --git a/doc/jigdo-file.1 b/doc/jigdo-file.1
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index b35a556..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,1175 +0,0 @@
-.\" This manpage has been automatically generated by docbook2man 
-.\" from a DocBook document. This tool can be found at:
-.\" <http://shell.ipoline.com/~elmert/comp/docbook2X/> 
-.\" Please send any bug reports, improvements, comments, patches, 
-.\" etc. to Steve Cheng <steve@ggi-project.org>.
-.TH "JIGDO-FILE" "1" "19 May 2006" "" ""
-
-.SH NAME
-jigdo-file \- Prepare files for Jigsaw Download (distribution of huge files, e.g. CD images).
-.SH SYNOPSIS
-
-\fBjigdo-file\fR \fB \fI COMMAND\fB
-\fR [ \fB--image=\fIcdrom.iso\fB\fR ] [ \fB--jigdo=\fIcdrom.jigdo\fB\fR ] [ \fB--template=\fIcdrom.template\fB\fR ] [ \fB--force\fR ] [ \fBMORE OPTIONS\fR ] [ \fB\fIFILES\fB\fR\fI ...\fR | \fB--files-from=\fIf\fB\fR ]
- \fBCommon COMMANDs: make-template,
-make-image, verify\fR
-
-.SH "DESCRIPTION"
-.PP
-Jigsaw Download, or short jigdo, is a scheme developed
-primarily to make it easy to distribute huge filesystem images
-(e.g. CD (ISO9660) or DVD (UDF) images) over the internet, but it
-could also be used for other data which is awkward to handle due
-to its size, like audio/video files or large software
-packages.
-.PP
-jigdo tries to ensure that the large file (always called
-\fIimage\fR from now on) is downloaded in small
-parts which can be stored on different servers. People who want to
-download the image do so by telling the \fBjigdo\fR(1) \fB(NOT IMPLEMENTED YET)\fR
-download tool to process one `\fI\&.jigdo\fR\&' file;
-using it, \fBjigdo\fR downloads the parts and
-reassembles the image. \fBjigdo-file\fR is used to
-prepare the files for download.
-.PP
-What makes jigdo special is that the parts that are used to
-reconstruct the image can have any size and content - they only
-need to be contained in a contiguous region anywhere in the
-image.
-.PP
-For example, if you wish to distribute an ISO9660 image
-which contains a snapshot of an FTP server, you can instruct
-\fBjigdo-file\fR to prepare the download data in such
-a way that when people use \fBjigdo\fR to download
-the image, \fBjigdo\fR actually fetches the
-individual files from the FTP server and assembles them into an
-exact copy of your image - during the download! (If the image is
-not a filesystem dump, you can use
-\fBsplit\fR(1) to create the small parts that the image will be
-reassembled from.)
-.PP
-You are completely free to choose where the individual parts
-of the image are stored: They may be in entirely different
-directories on different servers (e.g. because of
-storage/bandwidth constraints), but this is invisible to the
-people downloading your image. The information about available
-servers only needs to be added to the
-`\fI\&.jigdo\fR\&' file by you before distributing
-it.
-.PP
-The `DETAILS' section below contains technical details on
-how jigdo works. The `EXAMPLES' section lists a number of common
-scenarios and may help you to get an idea of what jigdo is useful
-for.
-.SH "OPTIONS"
-.PP
-Many options are specific to a particular
-\fICOMMAND\fR; the ones below are general or
-used by several commands. Further options are listed below with
-the individual commands. All options are silently ignored if they
-are not applicable to the current command. For any
-\fIBYTES\fR parameters to options, you can
-append one of the letters `k', `M' or `G' to the amount you
-specify, to indicate kilobytes, megabytes or gigabytes.
-.TP
-\fB-h --help\fR
-Output short summary of commands and options.
-.TP
-\fB-H --help-all\fR
-Output complete summary of commands and options.
-.TP
-\fB-v --version\fR
-Output program version.
-.TP
-\fB-i --image=\fIcdrom.iso\fB\fR
-Specify location of the file containing the image. The
-image is the large file that you want to distribute.
-.TP
-\fB-j --jigdo=\fIcdrom.jigdo\fB\fR
-Specify location of the Jigsaw Download description
-file. The jigdo file is a human-readable file generated by
-\fBjigdo-file\fR, to which you add information
-about all the servers you are going to upload the files to.
-\fBjigdo\fR will download this file as the
-first step of retrieving the image.
-.TP
-\fB-t --template=\fIcdrom.template\fB\fR
-Specify location of the image `template' file. The
-template file is a binary file generated by
-\fBjigdo-file\fR, it contains information on
-how to reassemble the image and also (in compressed form)
-all the data from the image which was not found in any of
-the parts.
-
-Depending on the command, each of these three files is
-used sometimes for input, sometimes for output. If the file
-is to be used for output for a particular command and the
-output file already exists, \fBjigdo-file\fR
-exits with an error, unless \fB--force\fR is
-present.
-
-In most cases, you will only need to specify one out
-of \fB-i\fR \fB-j\fR
-\fB-t\fR, because any missing filenames will be
-deduced from the one you specify. This is done by first
-stripping any extension from the supplied name and then
-appending nothing (if deducing \fB--image\fR),
-`\fI\&.jigdo\fR\&' or
-`\fI\&.template\fR\&'.
-.TP
-\fB-r --report=default|noprogress|quiet|grep\fR
-Control how verbose the program is, and what format
-the output has: \fBnoprogress\fR is the same as
-\fBdefault\fR except that no `x%
-done\&' progress messages are printed.
-\fBquiet\fR restricts the output to what is
-absolutely necessary, mostly error messages.
-\fBgrep\fR is only different from
-\fBdefault\fR for the
-\fBmake-template\fR command: It enables output
-in a simple `\fI<offset>
-<file>\fR\&' format which is useful when
-searching for binary files in other binary files.
-.TP
-\fB-f --force\fR
-Overwrite existent output files without
-complaining.
-.TP
-\fB--no-force\fR
-\fBThis is the default.\fR Refuse to
-overwrite existent output files.
-.TP
-\fB-c --cache=\fIjigdo-cache.db\fB\fR
-\fBjigdo-file\fR usually needs to read
-the entire contents of all the
-\fIFILES\fR you specify. If you use it
-repeatedly (e.g. because you make a new CD image available
-daily), caching the file information will increase the
-program's speed significantly. The cache file is
-automatically created if it is not yet present. Data is
-usually both read from and written to it.
-.TP
-\fB--no-cache\fR
-\fBThis is the default.\fR Do not use a
-cache.
-.TP
-\fB--cache-expiry=\fISECONDS\fB\fR
-Set maximum age of cache entries. Any entries older
-than this will be removed from the cache. The default is 30
-days. You can append one of the letters `h', `d', `w', `m',
-`y' to denote hours, days, weeks, months or years,
-respectively. A value of `0' or `off' disables expiry, so
-that all entries will stay in the cache forever. See the
-section `CACHE FILES' below for more information.
-.TP
-\fB--readbuffer=\fIBYTES\fB\fR
-Set size of internal buffers. The default is 128k - if
-you have a fast disc, increasing this value may make
-\fBjigdo-file\fR faster, but in general,
-changing it is not necessary.
-.TP
-\fB--md5-block-size=\fIBYTES\fB\fR
-\fBUninteresting internal parameter.\fR
-Set size of blocks into which files are subdivided. The
-default is 128k. If you change it, any cache file will have
-to be regenerated. Internally, \fBjigdo-file\fR
-may choose to use a slightly larger or smaller value.
-.TP
-\fB-T --files-from=\fIfile\fB\fR
-Read file and directory names from the specified file.
-If \fIfile\fR is `-', read names from
-standard input. Each line in the file is taken as a name, so
-the names may contain spaces, but not newline characters. An
-empty line causes \fBjigdo-file\fR to stop
-reading from the file.
-
-\fBfind\fR(1) is a powerful tool for generating file
-lists, but make sure to use `\fBfind -type
-f\fR\&' if possible - otherwise, if you instruct
-\fBfind\fR to output both a filename and a
-symlink to that filename, \fBjigdo-file\fR will
-read the file contents twice.
-.TP
-\fB--hex\fR
-Output checksums in hexadecimal instead of Base64-like
-format. This should not be used with the
-\fBmake-template\fR command, because the
-resulting `\fI\&.jigdo\fR\&' file violates the
-`\fI\&.jigdo\fR\&' file format. Its intended use
-is to make \fBjigdo-file\fR more interoperable
-with other Unix shell utilities like \fBmd5sum\fR(1)\&.
-.TP
-\fB--no-hex\fR
-\fBThis is the default.\fR Use jigdo's
-own Base64-like encoding of checksums.
-.TP
-\fB--debug[=help|=all|=\fIUNIT,~UNIT...\fB ]\fR
-Switch on or off debugging output. Just `--debug' is
-equivalent to `--debug=all'. The argument is a
-comma-separated list of unit names for which debugging
-output is to be enabled, or disabled if the name is preceded
-by `~'. The special name `all' means all units. By default,
-debugging output is switched off except for the units
-`assert' and `general'. The exact list of available units
-for which debugging can be switched on depends on whether
-jigdo was compiled with debugging support - the list can be
-printed with `--debug=help'.
-.TP
-\fB\fIFILES\fB\fR
-Names of files or directories to use as input. These
-are the parts that are contained in the image. In case one
-of the names is a directory, the program recursively scans
-the directory and adds all files contained in it. While
-doing this, it follows symbolic links, but avoids symlink
-loops.
-
-If one of the filenames starts with the character `-',
-you must precede the list of files with `--'. A value of `-'
-has \fBno\fR special meaning in this list, it
-stands for a file whose name is a single hyphen.
-.SH "COMMANDS"
-.PP
-The command name is the first non-option argument passed to
-\fBjigdo-file\fR\&. Most commands have short
-abbreviations as well as long names. \fBThe short command
-names should not be used in scripts - there may be incompatible
-changes to them in the future!\fR
-.SS "MAKE-TEMPLATE, MT"
-.PP
-Reads \fIimage\fR and
-\fIFILES\fR, creates
-`\fI\&.jigdo\fR\&' and
-`\fI\&.template\fR\&'. This is the main functionality
-of \fBjigdo-file\fR\&.
-.PP
-It is possible to specify both \fB--image=-\fR
-and \fB--files-from=-\fR\&. In this case, first the
-list of files is read from standard input until an empty line is
-encountered. Everything following it is assumed to be the image
-data. This can be useful if you use \fBmkisofs\fR(1) or similar programs that can output the complete
-image on their standard output, because there is no need to
-store the image on disc temporarily.
-.PP
-If a \fIFILES\fR argument contains
-the characters `//\&' (Unix) or
-`\\.\\\&' (Windows), this has special meaning. In
-the final jigdo file that users will download, each of the parts
-is referenced in the `[Parts]\&' section with a
-URI of the form `Label:some/filename'. (See `FORMAT OF .JIGDO
-FILES' below for a detailed description.) The
-`[Servers]\&' section gives a mapping of labels
-to servers on the internet, with lines like
-`Label=http://myserver.org/jigdofiles/'. Using this information,
-\fBjigdo\fR will create the final download URI for
-the part, `http://myserver.org/jigdofiles/some/filename'.
-Specifying `//\&' (or `\\.\\\&')
-in a file or directory name serves to `cut off' the names at the
-right directory level. For example, if the Unix path of one of
-your \fIFILES\fR is `/path/some/filename',
-you can tell \fBjigdo-file\fR to cut off after the
-`/path' by passing it the argument `/path//some/filename', or
-`/path//' if you want the whole directory scanned. The path
-names need not be absolute; `somedirectory//' is also
-possible.
-.TP
-\fB--label \fILabel=/path\fB\fR
-Specify a name to use as the label name for a path
-on disc. (Influences the output jigdo file.) If you used
-`//\&' in the
-\fIFILES\fR arguments as described
-above, \fBjigdo-file\fR will by default pick
-label names automatically (`A', `B' etc.). With this
-option, you can give labels more meaningful names. Note
-that the label name will only be used if one or more
-\fIFILES\fR begin with
-`/path//'.
-
-Try to use label names that start with uppercase
-characters, to disambiguate them clearly from protocol
-names like `http', `ftp'.
-.TP
-\fB--uri \fILabel=http://some.server.org/\fB\fR
-By default, using \fB--label\fR as
-described above will cause lines of the form
-`Label=file:/path/' to be written to the
-`[Servers]\&' section of the output jigdo
-file. If you want to override the `file:' URI so that the
-line reads `Label=http://some.server.org/', you can do so
-by specifying \fB--uri\fR along with
-\fB--label\fR\&. Giving just \fB--uri
-\fILabel=...\fB\fR without the
-corresponding \fB--label
-\fILabel=...\fB\fR has no
-effect, and even if you specify both, an entry is only
-added to the `[Servers]\&' section if the
-label is referenced by at least one
-`[Parts]\&' entry.
-
-The supplied value is not quoted by the program; if
-it contains characters such as space or any of the
-characters #"'\\ then you must quote it.
-(Under Unix, you may need to quote the value twice to also
-protect it from the shell, e.g. \\\\\\\\ or
-\&'\\\\' to get a single backslash in the
-URI.)
-
-The mapping specified with an \fB--uri\fR
-option is ignored if it is already present in the output
-jigdo file.
-
-Users of the Windows version may notice that the
-`\\\&' directory separators are converted
-into `/\&' in the `file:' URIs that are
-generated by default. This is done to increase
-cross-platform compatibility of `file:' - the
-\fBprint-missing\fR command of the Windows
-version will automatically re-convert the characters when
-it prints the URIs. In case you supply your own `file:'
-URIs under Windows using \fB--uri\fR, you must
-also exchange `/\&' and
-`\\\&'.
-.TP
-\fB-0 to -9\fR
-Set amount of compression in the output template
-file, from \fB-0\fR (no compression) to
-\fB-9\fR (maximum compression). The default is
-\fB-9\fR, which can make the template
-generation quite slow. By default, the compression
-algorithm used is the same as for \fBgzip\fR(1)\&.
-.TP
-\fB--gzip and --bzip2\fR
-Choose between the gzip and bzip2 compression
-algorithms. The default is gzip. Bzip2 usually gives
-a better compression ratio, but compression is
-significantly slower than with gzip.
-.TP
-\fB--min-length=\fIBYTES\fB\fR
-Set minimum length of a part for
-\fBjigdo-file\fR to look for it in the image.
-The default is 1k. Parts smaller than this will never be
-found in the image, so their data will be included in the
-template file. The search algorithm used requires such a
-minimum length, otherwise template generation could become
-extremely slow. If you know for sure that all your
-\fIFILES\fR are larger than a certain
-amount, you can increase \fBjigdo-file\fR\&'s
-speed slightly by specifying the amount with this option.
-There is a hard-wired absolute minimum of 256 bytes -
-anything lower will silently be set to 256.
-.TP
-\fB--merge=\fIFILE\fB\fR
-Include the contents of
-\fIFILE\fR in the output
-`\fI\&.jigdo\fR\&' file. The file can contain
-data which you want added to the output (for example, a
-`[Servers]\&' section with a list of your
-servers as entries), or it can be the jigdo file output by
-an earlier run of \fBjigdo-file\fR\&.
-
-It is possible to specify the same file for input
-with \fB--merge\fR and for output with
-\fB--jigdo\fR\&. However, you will also need to
-use \fB--force\fR to make the program overwrite
-the old version of the jigdo file with the new one.
-\fIFILE\fR can be `-' for standard
-input.
-
-When \fBadding\fR new information to
-the supplied file, \fBjigdo-file\fR will not
-insert new lines into the `[Parts]\&'
-section if an entry for the same MD5 checksum (but not
-necessarily with the same URI!) already exists, and it
-will not insert new lines into the
-`[Servers]\&' section if a completely
-identical entry already exists.
-
-When \fBreading in\fR the existing
-\fIFILE\fR, the behaviour is slightly
-different: The program \fBpreserves\fR
-entries in the `[Parts]\&' section with
-identical checksum, but different URIs. For completely
-identical entries (same checksum and URI), only one entry
-is preserved and the duplicates are removed. The
-`[Servers]\&' section is left
-untouched.
-.TP
-\fB--image-section\fR
-\fBThis is the default.\fR Causes
-\fBjigdo-file\fR to add an
-`[Image]\&' section to the
-`\fI\&.jigdo\fR\&' file.
-
-As an exception, a new `[Image]\&'
-section is \fBnot\fR added if you use
-\fB--merge\fR and the file to merge contains an
-`[Image]\&' section with a line which
-reads `Template-MD5Sum=\&' (end of line
-after the `='). In this case, the generated template
-data's MD5 checksum value is just added after the `=' of
-the first line of this form in the file - no whole new
-`[Image]\&' section is appended. This
-behaviour is useful because it allows you to pass via
-\fB--merge\fR an `[Image]\&'
-section with arbitrary content and then have the MD5
-checksum automatically added by
-\fBjigdo-file\fR\&. The section `FORMAT OF .JIGDO FILES' below explains the
-`[Image]\&' section contents in greater
-detail.
-.TP
-\fB--no-image-section\fR
-Do \fBnot\fR include an
-`[Image]\&' section in the
-`\fI\&.jigdo\fR\&' file. You need to add one
-yourself if you use this option. However, doing that is
-not easy (you also need to add a
-`Template-MD5Sum\&' line with the correct
-checksum, or \fBjigdo\fR will complain), so
-use of this option is discouraged.
-.TP
-\fB--servers-section\fR
-\fBThis is the default.\fR Causes
-\fBjigdo-file\fR to add a
-`[Servers]\&' section to the
-`\fI\&.jigdo\fR\&' file. This default section
-uses `file:' URIs, which allows for immediate reassembly
-of the image from the local filesystem, and is also useful
-if you want to edit the file manually and replace the
-`file:' URIs with other URIs.
-.TP
-\fB--no-servers-section\fR
-Do \fBnot\fR add a
-`[Servers]\&' section at the end of the
-`\fI\&.jigdo\fR\&' file. Useful e.g. if you are
-going to append the section with a script.
-.TP
-\fB--match-exec=\fISHELLCOMMAND\fB\fR
-Whenever a file is found in the image, execute the
-supplied command string by passing it to a shell.
-\fBjigdo-file\fR sets up a number of
-environment variables with information about the file
-match. For example, if the file
-`\fI/path//a/b/file\fR\&' was found in the
-image and `Label:a/b/file' is going to be written to the
-`\fI\&.jigdo\fR\&' file:
-.RS
-.TP 0.2i
-\(bu
-\fBLABEL\fR="Label" - Name of the label for the file. The example assumes
-that `\fB--label\fR
-Label=/path\&' was specified by you.
-In the absence of such an option, \fBLABEL\fR
-will be set but empty.
-.TP 0.2i
-\(bu
-\fBLABELPATH\fR="/path/" - The path corresponding to the label,
-or in other words, the prefix of the matched file's
-path that will \fBnot\fR appear in the
-output `\fI\&.jigdo\fR\&' file. Is set even
-without any `\fB--label\fR\&' option present.
-Ends with a slash.
-.TP 0.2i
-\(bu
-\fBMATCHPATH\fR="a/b/" - The rest of the path, without the
-leafname of the matched file. Is either empty or ends
-with a slash.
-.TP 0.2i
-\(bu
-\fBLEAF\fR="file"
-- The leafname of the matched file.
-.TP 0.2i
-\(bu
-\fBMD5SUM\fR="lNVdUSqbo2yqm33webrhnw" - The md5sum of the
-matched file, in Base64-like format.
-.TP 0.2i
-\(bu
-\fBFILE\fR="/path//a/b/file" - For convenience, the
-complete path of the file. The variable is always set
-to $LABELPATH$MATCHPATH$LEAF\&.
-.RE
-
-Please be careful to correctly quote the string
-passed to this option, otherwise your supplied command
-will not work with filenames that contain spaces. As an
-example, to create a backup of hard links to the matched
-files, use the following option:
---match-exec='mkdir -p "${LABEL:-.}/$MATCHPATH"
-&& ln -f "$FILE" "${LABEL:-.}/$MATCHPATH$LEAF"'
-
-By default, no command is executed. Use
---match-exec="" to remove a command string which was set
-with an earlier use of this option.
-.TP
-\fB--greedy-matching\fR
-\fBThis is the default.\fR Imagine
-that your image contains a \fI\&.tar\fR file
-which in turn contains another file
-\fIx\fR, and that you provide both the
-\fI\&.tar\fR and the files inside it on the
-command line. When \fBjigdo-file\fR scans the
-image, it encounters the beginning of the
-\fI\&.tar\fR file, and then the file
-\fIx\fR\&.
-
-At this point, a decision must be made: Should the
-smaller file \fIx\fR be recorded as
-matched, or should it be ignored in favour of the larger
-(and thus better) match of the \fI\&.tar\fR
-file? Unfortunately, at this point it is not clear
-whether there will actually be a full match of the
-\fI\&.tar\fR, so by default, the program
-prefers the small match.
-.TP
-\fB--no-greedy-matching\fR
-In the case where a large partial match is present
-and a shorter match has been confirmed, ignore the small
-match. (See the option above.)
-.SS "MAKE-IMAGE, MI"
-.PP
-Reads `\fI\&.template\fR\&' and
-\fIFILES\fR, creates
-\fIimage\fR (or
-`\fIimagename.tmp\fR\&'). Provides a rudimentary
-way of reassembling images - \fBjigdo\fR is usually
-better suited for this task. However, in contrast to
-\fBjigdo\fR, no `\fI\&.jigdo\fR\&' file
-is required.
-.PP
-If the image is to be written to a file (and not to
-standard output), it is possible to create the image in several
-steps, with several invocations of `\fBjigdo-file
-make-image\fR\&', as follows: You first invoke
-\fBjigdo-file\fR, specifying as many files as are
-available at this time. The program scans the files, and those
-that are contained in the image are copied to a temporary file,
-whose name is formed by appending `\fI\&.tmp\fR\&' to
-the image filename.
-.PP
-For all further files which could be parts of the image,
-you repeat this process. As soon as all parts are present, the
-temporary file will be truncated slightly (to delete some
-administrative data that \fBjigdo-file\fR appends
-at the end) and renamed to the final image name. The possibility
-of reassembling the image in several steps is especially useful
-for gathering files from removable media, e.g. several older
-CDs.
-.PP
-Scripts using \fBmake-image\fR can detect
-whether image creation is complete by checking the exit status:
-0 signals successful creation, whereas 1 means that more files
-need to be supplied. Other errors result in an exit status of 2
-(`recoverable', e.g. file not found) or 3 (non-recoverable, e.g.
-write error).
-.TP
-\fB--check-files\fR
-\fBThis is the default.\fR Whenever
-any part is copied to the image, re-check its checksum
-against the checksum stored in the template. It is
-recommended that you leave this switched on, even if it
-slows down image creation a bit.
-.TP
-\fB--no-check-files\fR
-Do not check files' checksums when copying them to
-the image. This can be safely used when no cache file is
-used (which means that files will be written to the image
-immediately after being scanned) or the whole image is
-checked later with the \fBverify\fR
-command.
-.SS "PRINT-MISSING, PM"
-.PP
-Reads `\fI\&.jigdo\fR\&',
-`\fI\&.template\fR\&' and (if present)
-`\fIimagename.tmp\fR\&', outputs a list of URIs
-still needed to completely reassemble the image.
-.PP
-Together with the \fBmake-image\fR command,
-this provides most of the functionality of
-\fBjigdo\fR on the command line.
-.PP
-For each part that is not yet present in the temporary
-image file, the file checksum is looked up in the
-`[Parts]\&' section of the jigdo file. Any
-label in the corresponding entry is then expanded according to
-the label definitions in the `[Servers]\&'
-section and printed on standard output. \fBjigdo\fR
-allows you to specify several alternative locations for each
-label in this section, but \fBprint-missing\fR will
-only output the first one for each missing part.
-.PP
-If the checksum cannot be found in the
-`[Parts]\&' section (this Should Not Happen
-unless you deleted that section), a lookup is instead made for
-`MD5Sum:\fI<checksum>\fR\&', just like
-with \fBjigdo\fR\&. (Thus, if you want to get rid of
-the `[Parts]\&' section, you can do so if you
-rename each part to its own checksum.)
-.TP
-\fB--uri \fILabel=http://some.server.org/\fB\fR
-Override the entries in the
-`\fI\&.jigdo\fR\&' file for any label with a
-URI of your choice. With the example above, a
-`[Parts]\&' entry of
-`Label:some/filename' will cause the line
-`http://some.server.org/some/filename' to be
-printed.
-
-The supplied value is not quoted by the program; if
-it contains characters such as space or any of the
-characters #"'\\ then you must quote it.
-(Under Unix, you may need to quote the value twice to also
-protect it from the shell, e.g. \\\\\\\\ or
-\&'\\\\' to get a single backslash in the
-URI.)
-.SS "PRINT-MISSING-ALL, PMA"
-.PP
-Just like \fBprint-missing\fR, this command
-outputs a list of URIs still needed to completely reassemble the
-image. However, \fBall\fR alternative download
-locations are printed instead of just one. In the output, the
-URIs for a file are separated from other files' URIs with blank
-lines. The \fB--uri\fR option has the same effect as
-for \fBprint-missing\fR\&.
-.SS "VERIFY, VER"
-.PP
-Reads \fIimage\fR (presumably
-generated with \fBmake-image\fR) and
-`\fI\&.template\fR\&', checks for correct checksum of
-image.
-.PP
-The template data does not only contain checksums of the
-individual parts, but also of the image as a whole.
-\fBmake-image\fR already performs a number of
-internal checks, but if you like, you can additionally check the
-image with this command.
-.SS "SCAN, SC"
-.PP
-Reads all the \fIFILES\fR and enters
-them into the cache, unless they are already cached. The
-\fB--cache\fR option must be present for this
-command.
-.TP
-\fB--no-scan-whole-file\fR
-\fBThis is the default.\fR This only
-causes the first \fB--md5-block-size\fR bytes
-of each file to be read. If the cache is used later by
-\fBjigdo-file make-image\fR, the rest of the
-file will be read once these first bytes are recognized in
-the input image.
-.TP
-\fB--scan-whole-file\fR
-Immediately read the entire file contents and store
-them in the cache.
-.SS "MD5SUM, MD5"
-.PP
-Reads all the \fIFILES\fR and prints
-out MD5 checksums of their contents. This command is quite
-similar to \fBmd5sum\fR(1), except that the checksum is output in the
-Base64-like encoding which is also used elsewhere by
-\fBjigdo-file\fR\&.
-.PP
-The \fIFILES\fR arguments are
-processed in the same way as with the other commands, which
-means that recursion automatically takes place for any arguments
-that are directories, and that symbolic links are not listed
-except when the file(s) they point to are not reachable
-directly.
-.PP
-In the checksum list printed on standard output, only the
-part of the filename following any `//\&' (or
-`\\.\\\&' on Windows) is printed. Any
-\fB--cache\fR will be used for querying files' MD5
-checksums and/or writing the checksums of scanned files.
-.SS "LIST-TEMPLATE, LS"
-.PP
-Reads a `\fI\&.template\fR\&' file and outputs
-low-level information about the image and all parts contained in
-it, including offset, length and checksum.
-.PP
-You can also use this command with temporary image files
-(by specifying something like
-\fB--template=imagename.tmp\fR) - in that case, the
-output also distinguishes between parts that have been written
-to the image and parts that haven't.
-.PP
-The exact output format may change incompatibly between
-different jigdo releases. The following different types of lines
-can be output. `have-file' only occurs for
-`\fI\&.tmp\fR\&' files, indicating a file that has
-already been successfully written to the temporary file:
-
-.nf
-in-template \fIoffset-in-image length\fR
-need-file \fIoffset-in-image length file-md5sum filestart-rsyncsum\fR
-have-file \fIoffset-in-image length file-md5sum filestart-rsyncsum\fR
-image-info \fIimage-length image-md5sum rsyncsum-size\fR
-.fi
-.SH "DETAILS"
-.PP
-Jigsaw Download was created with the format of ISO9660 CD
-images in mind - however, the following also applies to many other
-filesystem formats, as well as to `tar' archives and uncompressed
-`zip' archives. A CD image contains both information for
-organizing the filesystem (header with disc name etc., ISO9660
-directory data, data of extensions such as Joliet or RockRidge,
-zero padding) and the files contained on the CD. An important
-property that jigdo relies on is that each file is stored in one
-contiguous section of the image; it is not split into two or more
-parts.
-.PP
-When \fBjigdo-file\fR is given a number of
-files that might be contained in an image, it detects whether any
-of the files are present using a `rolling checksum' inspired by
-the one used by \fBrsync\fR(1)\&. The resulting data is
-written to the `\fI\&.template\fR\&' file: If a section
-of the image could not be matched (e.g. it was directory
-information), the data is compressed and written directly to the
-template. However, if a matching file was found, its data is
-omitted from the template. Instead, only a reference (an MD5
-checksum of the file) is inserted in the template.
-.PP
-Note that the template data only contains binary data, it
-does not contain any filenames or URIs, since it cannot be easily
-edited in case any of these values need to be changed. All that
-information is stored in the `\fI\&.jigdo\fR\&' file, a
-text file to which you can add URLs for your server(s). The jigdo
-file provides a mapping for each MD5 checksum to one or more
-alternative download locations for the corresponding part.
-.PP
-Apart from the mapping of MD5 sums to URIs, the jigdo file
-also contains an URI pointing to a download location for the
-template file. This way, the \fBjigdo\fR download
-tool only needs to be given one URI (that of the
-`\fI\&.jigdo\fR\&' file) to be able to download and
-reassemble the complete image.
-.SH "FORMAT OF .JIGDO FILES"
-.PP
-The overall format of `\fI\&.jigdo\fR\&' files
-follows that of `\fI\&.ini\fR\&' files, as also used by
-the Gnome and KDE projects for some data. The file is organized
-into sections, each of which is preceded by a line reading
-`[Sectionname]\&'. Within each section, lines
-have the form `Label=Value'. Such lines are also called `entries'
-below. All `\fI\&.jigdo\fR\&' files use UTF-8 as their
-character encoding.
-.PP
-Comments are introduced with the `#\&'
-character and extend to the end of the line. Whitespace is ignored
-at line start and end as well as to the left and right of section
-names and the `=\&' in entries. Furthermore, the
-jigdo utilities split up the text of the entry value (i.e. the
-part after the `=\&') into whitespace-separated
-words, much like the Unix shell. Single \&'' and
-double "" quotes can be used to prevent that
-e.g. URIs containing whitespace are split apart. Similarly,
-characters with special meaning (the characters
-\&'"#\\ and space/tab) must be quoted with
-\\ to appear in the value. As with the shell,
-there is a difference between \&'\~\&' and
-"\~": Within \&'\~\&',
-the characters "#\\ and whitespace lose their
-special meaning and become ordinary characters, whereas within
-"\~", only the characters
-\&'# and whitespace lose their special meaning -
-in other words, backslash escapes still work inside
-"\~", but not
-\&'\~\&'\&.
-.PP
-`\fI\&.jigdo\fR\&' files can optionally be
-compressed with \fBgzip\fR(1)\&. \fBjigdo-file\fR always outputs
-uncompressed files, which you can compress yourself.
-\fBjigdo-lite\fR supports single uncompressed and
-compressed files.
-.PP
-(Behaviour which may change in the future and which should
-not be relied upon: \fBjigdo\fR additionally supports
-any number of concatenated plaintext and gzipped parts in the
-files - for example, you can compress a
-`\fI\&.jigdo\fR\&' file and then add a couple of lines
-of uncompressed data to the end.)
-.PP
-In all cases, the `\fI\&.gz\fR\&' extension
-should be removed from the filename - the tools will determine
-automatically from the file contents whether a file is compressed
-or not.
-.PP
-Below is a description of the individual section names used
-by jigdo.
-.SS "JIGDO SECTION"
-
-.nf
-[Jigdo]
-Version=1.1
-Generator=jigdo-file/1.0.0
-.fi
-.PP
-Information about the version of the jigdo file format
-used, and the program that generated it. There should be one
-such section per `\fI\&.jigdo\fR\&' file.
-.SS "IMAGE SECTION"
-
-.nf
-[Image]
-Filename=\fI"filename for saving on user's disc"\fR
-Template=\fI"URI where to fetch template file"\fR
-Template-MD5Sum=OQ8riqT1BuyzsrT9964A7g
-ShortInfo=\fIsingle-line description of the image (200 characters max.)\fR
-Info=\fIlong description (5000 characters max.)\fR
-.fi
-.PP
-The value for the `Template' entry can be either an URL
-(absolute or relative to the URL of the jigdo file) or a string
-of the form `\fILabel\fR:\fIpathname\fR\&' (\fBUNIMPLEMENTED\fR),
-as described below.
-.PP
-The `Template-MD5Sum' entry is added by
-\fBjigdo-file\fR and specifies the MD5 checksum of
-the generated `\fI\&.template\fR\&' file. It is used
-by \fBjigdo\fR to detect cases where the downloaded
-template data is corrupted or belongs to a different
-image.
-.PP
-Unlike other entry values, the values of the
-`ShortInfo\&' and `Info\&'
-entries are \fBnot\fR split up into words,
-instead all quoting is preserved.
-.PP
-The value of the `Info\&' entry is
-special in that \fBjigdo\fR(1) can optionally parse XML markup it contains. If
-the markup has errors such as unbalanced/unsupported tags, the
-string is displayed literally, without XML parsing. Supported
-tags are <b></b> (bold),
-<i></i> (italic),
-<tt></tt> (typewriter font),
-<u></u> (underline),
-<big></big> (larger font),
-<small></small> (smaller font)
-and <br/> (linebreak). Supported
-entities include &lt; (`<\&'),
-&gt; (`>\&') and
-&amp; (`&\&'). Note that the whole
-`Info\&' entry must be on one line in the jigdo
-file.
-.PP
-This section may occur multiple times, but all except the
-first one will be ignored. This is useful e.g. when creating a
-`\fI\&.jigdo\fR\&' file for a DVD image when you
-already have `\fI\&.jigdo\fR\&' files for CDs with
-the same content: You can simply `[Include]\&'
-(see below) the CDs' jigdo files at the end of the DVD jigdo
-file, after its `[Image]\&' section.
-.SS "PARTS SECTION"
-
-.nf
-[Parts]
-xJNkjrq8NYMraeGavUpllw=LabelA:part0
-GoTResP2EC6Lb_2wTsqOoQ=LabelA:part1
-kyfebwu6clbYqqWUdFIyaw=LabelB:some/path/part2
--J9UAimo0Bqg9c0oOXI1mQ=http://some.where.com/part3
-.fi
-.PP
-All lines in the section, which provides the mapping from
-MD5 checksums to URIs, have the same format: On the left side of
-the `=\&' the checksum (encoded with a
-Base64-like encoding) is given, and on the right a string
-corresponding to the part with this checksum; either a complete
-URI or a string of the form `\fILabel\fR:\fIpathname\fR\&', which is expanded into
-one or more URIs by looking up the definition(s) for the
-\fILabel\fR in the
-`[Servers]\&' section.
-.PP
-In case a particular MD5 checksum cannot be found in any
-`[Parts]\&' section by
-\fBjigdo\fR, the program will perform a lookup for
-`MD5Sum:\fI<checksum>\fR\&', e.g. for
-`MD5Sum:xJNkjrq8NYMraeGavUpllw\&' if you
-deleted the line for `part0' above.
-.PP
-A checksum appearing multiple times in this section
-indicates alternative download locations for the part.
-.PP
-There may be any number of `[Parts]\&'
-sections in the file; they are all considered when looking up
-MD5 checksums.
-.PP
-\fBjigdo-file\fR always puts the
-`[Parts]\&' section at the end of the file, and
-it even rearranges any file specified with
-\fB--merge\fR to have only one such section at the
-end. This is done to allow \fBjigdo\fR to display
-the information from the `[Image]\&' section
-while the rest of that file is still being downloaded.
-.SS "SERVERS SECTION"
-
-.nf
-[Servers]
-LabelA=http://myserver.org/
-LabelA=ftp://mirror.myserver.org/
-LabelB=LabelC:subdirectory/
-LabelC=http://some.where.com/jigdo/
-.fi
-.PP
-All lines in the section, which provides the mapping from
-server labels to server locations, have the same format: On the
-left side of the `=\&' the label name is given,
-and on the right the value to expand the label name to.
-.PP
-A label name appearing multiple times in this section
-indicates alternative download locations for the parts that use
-the label in the `[Parts]\&' section. This
-notation makes it very easy to add mirrors to the jigdo
-file.
-.PP
-As shown by the example above, the label values may
-themselves reference other labels. In this case, the entry
-`LabelB:some/path/part2' in the `[Parts]\&'
-section will expand to
-`http://some.where.com/jigdo/subdirectory/some/path/part2'.
-Loops in the label definitions result in undefined behaviour and
-must be avoided.
-.PP
-There may be any number of `[Servers]\&'
-sections in the file; they are all considered when looking up
-labels. Either of `[Parts]\&' or
-`[Servers]\&', but not both, can be omitted
-from the jigdo file.
-.SS "COMMENT SECTION"
-
-.nf
-[Comment]
-Any text, except that lines must not begin with `['.
-.fi
-.PP
-All text following a `[Comment]\&' or
-`[comment]\&' line is ignored, up to the next
-line with a section label.
-.SS "INCLUDE DIRECTIVE"
-
-.nf
-[Include http://some.url/file.jigdo]
-.fi
-.PP
-Lines of this form cause the content of the specified
-jigdo file to be downloaded and parsed just like the main jigdo
-file. The effect will be the same as copying the included file's
-contents into the file which contains the include
-directive. (Exception: Any relative URLs are always resolved
-using the URL of the `\fI\&.jigdo\fR\&' file that
-contains that relative URL.)
-.PP
-The URL argument can be an absolute or relative URL. 
-Relative URLs are assumed to be relative to the URL of the jigdo
-file which contains the include directive. Includes can be
-nested, but it is an error to create a loop of include
-directives. It is \fBnot\fR possible to use URLs
-of the form `\fILabel\fR:\fIpathname\fR\&'.
-.PP
-The URL cannot be quoted with "". Any
-`]\&' characters in the argument must be
-escaped as `%5D\&', and any spaces as
-`%20\&'.
-.PP
-Include directives are only supported by
-\fBjigdo\fR, they are ignored by
-\fBjigdo-lite\fR\&.
-.PP
-An include directive terminates any previous section, but
-it does not start a new one. In other words, a new section must
-always be started after the include line,
-\fBjigdo\fR does not allow normal entries to appear
-below the `[Include]\&'.
-.SH "CACHE FILES"
-.PP
-Any file specified with the \fB--cache\fR option
-is used to store information about the
-\fIFILES\fR presented to
-\fBjigdo-file\fR\&. When querying the cache, a file is
-considered unchanged (and the cached data is used) only if
-filename, file size and last modification time (mtime) match
-exactly. For the filename match, not the entire file name is used,
-but only the part following any `//\&', so that
-any changes to the part before the `//\&' will
-not invalidate the cache.
-.PP
-Old cache entries are removed from the cache if they have
-not been read from or written to for the amount of time specified
-with \fB--cache-expiry\fR\&. Entries are
-\fBnot\fR immediately removed from the cache if the
-file they refer to no longer exists - this makes it possible to
-cache information about files on removable media.
-.PP
-Cache expiry only takes place \fBafter\fR
-\fBjigdo-file\fR has done its main work - if any old
-entries are accessed before expiry takes place, they will be kept.
-For example, if the program is run using the default expiry time
-of 30 days, but accesses a cache file with entries generated 2
-months ago, then entries in that cache \fBwill\fR
-be considered, and only those cache entries that were not needed
-during the program run will be expired.
-.PP
-Due to a peculiarity of the underlying database library
-(libdb3), cache files never shrink, they only grow. If a large
-number of entries was expired from your cache file and you want it
-to shrink, you can either just delete it (of course then
-everything will have to be regenerated) or use the utilities
-accompanying libdb3 to dump and restore the database, with a
-command like `\fBdb3_dump
-\fIold-cache.db\fB | db3_load
-\fInew-cache.db\fB\fR\&'. For Debian, these programs are supplied in the
-package `libdb3-util'.
-.PP
-If a different \fB--md5-block-size\fR is
-specified, the entire file needs to be re-read to update its cache
-entry. If a different \fB--min-length\fR is specified,
-only the first `md5-block-size' bytes of the file need to be
-re-read.
-.SH "EXAMPLES"
-.SS "PREPARING YOUR CD IMAGE FOR DISTRIBUTION"
-.PP
-You have created a CD image
-`\fIimage.iso\fR\&' from some of the files stored
-in the directory `\fI/home/ftp\fR\&' on your
-harddisc, which is also available online as `ftp://mysite.org'.
-As you don't want to waste space by effectively hosting the same
-data twice (once as files on the FTP server, once inside the
-image), and you are fed up with users' downloads aborting after
-200MB and their restarting the download dozens of times, you
-decide to use jigdo. How do you prepare the image for
-download?
-.PP
-In fact, only one command is necessary:
-.sp
-.RS
-.PP
-\fBjigdo-file make-template
---image=image.iso --jigdo=/home/ftp/image.jigdo
---template=/home/ftp/image.template /home/ftp// --label
-Mysite=/home/ftp --uri
-Mysite=ftp://mysite.org/\fR
-.RE
-.PP
-People can now point \fBjigdo\fR at
-`ftp://mysite.org/image.jigdo' to download your image. The
-template file needs to be accessible as
-`ftp://mysite.org/image.template'.
-.PP
-Note that nothing prevents you from doing the same for an
-FTP server that isn't administrated by you - in that case, you
-only need to host the `\fI\&.jigdo\fR\&' and
-`\fI\&.template\fR\&' files on your own
-server/homepage.
-.SS "PREPARING AN ARBITRARY LARGE FILE FOR DISTRIBUTION"
-.PP
-We assume that you have a large file that is not a
-filesystem, e.g. `\fImovie.mpeg\fR\&'. Because of
-space problems, you want to distribute the data on two
-servers.
-.PP
-In this case, the parts of the image need to be generated
-artificially with the \fBsplit\fR command. For
-example, to create chunks of 4MB each, use `\fBsplit -b 4m
-movie.mpeg part\fR\&'. Copy the resulting files
-`\fIpartXX\fR\&' into
-two directories `\fI1\fR\&' and
-`\fI2\fR\&' that you create, according to how you
-want the files distributed between the servers. Next, create the
-jigdo and template files with `\fBjigdo-file make-template
---image=movie.mpeg 1// 2//\fR\&'. You will need to edit the
-`\fI\&.jigdo\fR\&' file and provide the right URIs
-for the two servers that you are going to upload the
-`\fIpartXX\fR\&' files
-to.
-.SS "CUSTOMIZED VERSIONS OF IMAGES"
-.PP
-Because it is possible to assign a different URI for each
-part of an image if necessary, jigdo is very flexible. Only one
-example is the possibility of customized versions of images:
-Suppose that someone is distributing a CD image, and that you
-want to make a few small changes to it and redistribute your own
-version. You download the `\fIofficial.iso\fR\&' CD
-image with \fBjigdo\fR (passing it the URL of
-`\fIofficial.jigdo\fR\&'), write it to CD-R, make
-your changes (say, adding files from the
-`\fImyfiles\fR\&' directory on your harddisc) and
-produce your own version, `\fImyversion.iso\fR\&'.
-Next, you instruct \fBjigdo-file\fR to create the
-jigdo and template files for your modified image, using the
-command
-.sp
-.RS
-.PP
-\fBjigdo-file make-template
---image=myversion.iso /mnt/cdrom/ myfiles// --label
-My=myfiles/ --uri My=http://my.homepage.net/
---merge=official.jigdo\fR
-.RE
-while `\fIofficial.iso\fR\&' is mounted under
-`\fI/mnt/cdrom\fR\&'. By using
-\fB--merge\fR, you have told
-\fBjigdo-file\fR to take the contents of
-`\fIofficial.jigdo\fR\&', add to it a new
-`[Image]\&' section for
-`\fImyversion.iso\fR\&' and write the resulting
-jigdo file to `\fImyversion.jigdo\fR\&' - so now
-`\fImyversion.jigdo\fR\&' offers two images for
-download, the original version and your modified version. (If
-you do not want it to offer the official version, edit it and
-remove the `[Image]\&' section that lists
-`\fIofficial.iso\fR\&'.)
-.PP
-Now you can upload the `\fI\&.jigdo\fR\&' file,
-the `\fI\&.template\fR\&' file and also the files in
-`\fImyfiles\fR\&' to `http://my.homepage.net/'.
-Thus, for people to download your modified image, you do
-\fBnot\fR need to upload the complete image
-contents to your web space, but only the changes you
-made!
-.PP
-(In case you only made very few changes, you could also
-omit the `myfiles' parameter in the command above, then all your
-changes end up in the new template file.)
-.SS "COMBINING MANY JIGDO-MANAGED IMAGES INTO ONE"
-.PP
-It is also no problem to combine data from several sources
-that use jigdo. For example, if of five different and unrelated
-servers each one distributes a different CD image via jigdo, you
-can create a customized DVD image that contains the data from
-all these CDs. When people use \fBjigdo\fR to
-download your image, the individual files on the DVD are fetched
-from the same sources as the original CDs.
-.PP
-Consequently, even though you will be distributing a 3.2GB
-file via your web space, the actual amount of data that is
-stored on your server will only be in the order of several
-MBs.
-.SH "BUGS"
-.PP
-For certain contents of one of the input files, most notably
-a sequence of zero bytes longer than \fB--min-length\fR
-at the start of the file and an area of zeros preceding the file
-data in the image, \fBjigdo-file make-template\fR may
-fail to find the file in the image. Unfortunately, this
-restriction cannot be avoided because the program could become
-very slow otherwise. If you use the \fB--debug\fR
-option, all instances of \fBjigdo-file\fR discarding
-possible matches are indicated by lines containing the word
-`DROPPED\&'.
-.PP
-In fact, not only all-zeroes files trigger this behaviour,
-but also files which contain at their start a long sequence of
-short identical strings. For example, both a file containing only
-`a\&' characters and one containing
-`abcabcabcabc\&...' are problematic.
-.SH "SEE ALSO"
-.PP
-\fBjigdo\fR(1) (NOT YET IMPLEMENTED),
-\fBjigdo-lite\fR(1),
-\fBjigdo-mirror\fR(1),
-\fBsplit\fR(1) (or `\fBinfo split\fR\&'),
-\fBfind\fR(1) (or `\fBinfo find\fR\&'),
-\fBmkisofs\fR(1),
-\fBmd5sum\fR(1)
-.SH "AUTHOR"
-.PP
-Jigsaw
-Download <URL:http://atterer.org/jigdo/> was written by Richard Atterer
-<jigdo atterer.org>, to make downloading of CD ROM
-images for the Debian Linux distribution more convenient.
diff --git a/doc/jigdo-file.html b/doc/jigdo-file.html
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 84cb7bd..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,958 +0,0 @@
-<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01
-Transitional//EN""http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/loose.dtd">
-<HTML>
- <HEAD>
-  <TITLE>jigdo-file</TITLE><META NAME="GENERATOR" CONTENT="Modular DocBook
-  HTML Stylesheet Version 1.79"></HEAD>
- <BODY CLASS="REFENTRY" BGCOLOR="#FFFFFF" TEXT="#000000" LINK="#0000FF"
-  VLINK="#840084" ALINK="#0000FF">
-  <H1><A NAME="AEN1"></A>jigdo-file</H1>
-  <DIV><A NAME="AEN14"></A>
-   <H2>Name</H2>jigdo-file&nbsp;--&nbsp;Prepare files for Jigsaw Download
-   (distribution of huge files, e.g. CD images).</DIV>
-  <DIV><A NAME="AEN17"></A>
-   <H2>Synopsis</H2>
-   <P><B>jigdo-file</B> { <TT><I> COMMAND</I></TT> } [<CODE>--image=<TT><I
-    >cdrom.iso</I></TT></CODE>] [<CODE>--jigdo=<TT><I>cdrom.jigdo</I></TT
-    ></CODE>] [<CODE>--template=<TT><I>cdrom.template</I></TT></CODE>]
-    [<CODE>--force</CODE>] [MORE OPTIONS] [<TT><I>FILES</I></TT> | <CODE
-    >--files-from=<TT><I>f</I></TT></CODE>]<BR> Common COMMANDs:
-    make-template, make-image, verify </P></DIV>
-  <DIV><A NAME="DESCRIPTION"></A>
-   <H2>DESCRIPTION</H2>
-   <P>Jigsaw Download, or short jigdo, is a scheme developed primarily to
-    make it easy to distribute huge filesystem images (e.g. CD (ISO9660) or
-    DVD (UDF) images) over the internet, but it could also be used for
-    other data which is awkward to handle due to its size, like audio/video
-    files or large software packages.</P>
-   <P>jigdo tries to ensure that the large file (always called <I>image</I
-    > from now on) is downloaded in small parts which can be stored on
-    different servers. People who want to download the image do so by
-    telling the <SPAN><SPAN>jigdo</SPAN>(1)</SPAN> <SPAN><I>(NOT
-    IMPLEMENTED YET)</I></SPAN> download tool to process one `<TT
-    >.jigdo</TT>' file; using it, <B>jigdo</B> downloads the parts and
-    reassembles the image. <B>jigdo-file</B> is used to prepare the files
-    for download.</P>
-   <P>What makes jigdo special is that the parts that are used to
-    reconstruct the image can have any size and content - they only need to
-    be contained in a contiguous region anywhere in the image.</P>
-   <P>For example, if you wish to distribute an ISO9660 image which
-    contains a snapshot of an FTP server, you can instruct <B
-    >jigdo-file</B> to prepare the download data in such a way that when
-    people use <B>jigdo</B> to download the image, <B>jigdo</B> actually
-    fetches the individual files from the FTP server and assembles them
-    into an exact copy of your image - during the download! (If the image
-    is not a filesystem dump, you can use <SPAN><SPAN>split</SPAN
-    >(1)</SPAN> to create the small parts that the image will be
-    reassembled from.)</P>
-   <P>You are completely free to choose where the individual parts of the
-    image are stored: They may be in entirely different directories on
-    different servers (e.g. because of storage/bandwidth constraints), but
-    this is invisible to the people downloading your image. The information
-    about available servers only needs to be added to the `<TT>.jigdo</TT
-    >' file by you before distributing it.</P>
-   <P>The `DETAILS' section below contains technical details on how jigdo
-    works. The `EXAMPLES' section lists a number of common scenarios and
-    may help you to get an idea of what jigdo is useful for.</P></DIV>
-  <DIV><A NAME="OPTIONS"></A>
-   <H2>OPTIONS</H2>
-   <P>Many options are specific to a particular <TT><I>COMMAND</I></TT>;
-    the ones below are general or used by several commands. Further options
-    are listed below with the individual commands. All options are silently
-    ignored if they are not applicable to the current command. For any <TT
-    ><I>BYTES</I></TT> parameters to options, you can append one of the
-    letters `k', `M' or `G' to the amount you specify, to indicate
-    kilobytes, megabytes or gigabytes.</P>
-   <P></P>
-   <DIV>
-    <DL>
-     <DT><CODE>-h</CODE> <CODE>--help</CODE></DT>
-     <DD>
-      <P>Output short summary of commands and options.</P></DD>
-     <DT><CODE>-H</CODE> <CODE>--help-all</CODE></DT>
-     <DD>
-      <P>Output complete summary of commands and options.</P></DD>
-     <DT><CODE>-v</CODE> <CODE>--version</CODE></DT>
-     <DD>
-      <P>Output program version.</P></DD>
-     <DT><CODE>-i</CODE> <CODE>--image=<TT><I>cdrom.iso</I></TT></CODE
-      ></DT>
-     <DD>
-      <P>Specify location of the file containing the image. The image is
-       the large file that you want to distribute.</P></DD>
-     <DT><CODE>-j</CODE> <CODE>--jigdo=<TT><I>cdrom.jigdo</I></TT></CODE
-      ></DT>
-     <DD>
-      <P>Specify location of the Jigsaw Download description file. The
-       jigdo file is a human-readable file generated by <B>jigdo-file</B>,
-       to which you add information about all the servers you are going to
-       upload the files to. <B>jigdo</B> will download this file as the
-       first step of retrieving the image.</P></DD>
-     <DT><CODE>-t</CODE> <CODE>--template=<TT><I>cdrom.template</I></TT
-      ></CODE></DT>
-     <DD>
-      <P>Specify location of the image `template' file. The template file
-       is a binary file generated by <B>jigdo-file</B>, it contains
-       information on how to reassemble the image and also (in compressed
-       form) all the data from the image which was not found in any of the
-       parts.</P>
-      <P>Depending on the command, each of these three files is used
-       sometimes for input, sometimes for output. If the file is to be used
-       for output for a particular command and the output file already
-       exists, <B>jigdo-file</B> exits with an error, unless <CODE
-       >--force</CODE> is present.</P>
-      <P>In most cases, you will only need to specify one out of <CODE
-       >-i</CODE> <CODE>-j</CODE> <CODE>-t</CODE>, because any missing
-       filenames will be deduced from the one you specify. This is done by
-       first stripping any extension from the supplied name and then
-       appending nothing (if deducing <CODE>--image</CODE>), `<TT
-       >.jigdo</TT>' or `<TT>.template</TT>'.</P></DD>
-     <DT><CODE>-r</CODE> <CODE
-      >--report=default|noprogress|quiet|grep</CODE></DT>
-     <DD>
-      <P>Control how verbose the program is, and what format the output
-       has: <CODE>noprogress</CODE> is the same as <CODE>default</CODE>
-       except that no `<SAMP>x% done</SAMP>' progress messages are printed.
-       <CODE>quiet</CODE> restricts the output to what is absolutely
-       necessary, mostly error messages. <CODE>grep</CODE> is only
-       different from <CODE>default</CODE> for the <B>make-template</B>
-       command: It enables output in a simple `<TT><I>&lt;offset&gt;
-       &lt;file&gt;</I></TT>' format which is useful when searching for
-       binary files in other binary files.</P></DD>
-     <DT><CODE>-f</CODE> <CODE>--force</CODE></DT>
-     <DD>
-      <P>Overwrite existent output files without complaining.</P></DD>
-     <DT><CODE>--no-force</CODE></DT>
-     <DD>
-      <P><SPAN><I>This is the default.</I></SPAN> Refuse to overwrite
-       existent output files.</P></DD>
-     <DT><CODE>-c</CODE> <CODE>--cache=<TT><I>jigdo-cache.db</I></TT
-      ></CODE></DT>
-     <DD>
-      <P><B>jigdo-file</B> usually needs to read the entire contents of all
-       the <TT><I>FILES</I></TT> you specify. If you use it repeatedly
-       (e.g. because you make a new CD image available daily), caching the
-       file information will increase the program's speed significantly.
-       The cache file is automatically created if it is not yet present.
-       Data is usually both read from and written to it.</P></DD>
-     <DT><CODE>--no-cache</CODE></DT>
-     <DD>
-      <P><SPAN><I>This is the default.</I></SPAN> Do not use a cache.</P
-      ></DD>
-     <DT><CODE>--cache-expiry=<TT><I>SECONDS</I></TT></CODE></DT>
-     <DD>
-      <P>Set maximum age of cache entries. Any entries older than this will
-       be removed from the cache. The default is 30 days. You can append
-       one of the letters `h', `d', `w', `m', `y' to denote hours, days,
-       weeks, months or years, respectively. A value of `0' or `off'
-       disables expiry, so that all entries will stay in the cache forever.
-       See the section `CACHE FILES' below for more information.</P></DD>
-     <DT><CODE>--readbuffer=<TT><I>BYTES</I></TT></CODE></DT>
-     <DD>
-      <P>Set size of internal buffers. The default is 128k - if you have a
-       fast disc, increasing this value may make <B>jigdo-file</B> faster,
-       but in general, changing it is not necessary.</P></DD>
-     <DT><CODE>--md5-block-size=<TT><I>BYTES</I></TT></CODE></DT>
-     <DD>
-      <P><SPAN><I>Uninteresting internal parameter.</I></SPAN> Set size of
-       blocks into which files are subdivided. The default is 128k. If you
-       change it, any cache file will have to be regenerated. Internally,
-       <B>jigdo-file</B> may choose to use a slightly larger or smaller
-       value.</P></DD>
-     <DT><CODE>-T</CODE> <CODE>--files-from=<TT><I>file</I></TT></CODE
-      ></DT>
-     <DD>
-      <P>Read file and directory names from the specified file. If <TT><I
-       >file</I></TT> is `-', read names from standard input. Each line in
-       the file is taken as a name, so the names may contain spaces, but
-       not newline characters. An empty line causes <B>jigdo-file</B> to
-       stop reading from the file.</P>
-      <P><SPAN><SPAN>find</SPAN>(1)</SPAN> is a powerful tool for
-       generating file lists, but make sure to use `<B>find -type f</B>' if
-       possible - otherwise, if you instruct <B>find</B> to output both a
-       filename and a symlink to that filename, <B>jigdo-file</B> will read
-       the file contents twice.</P></DD>
-     <DT><CODE>--hex</CODE></DT>
-     <DD>
-      <P>Output checksums in hexadecimal instead of Base64-like format.
-       This should not be used with the <B>make-template</B> command,
-       because the resulting `<TT>.jigdo</TT>' file violates the `<TT
-       >.jigdo</TT>' file format. Its intended use is to make <B
-       >jigdo-file</B> more interoperable with other Unix shell utilities
-       like <SPAN><SPAN>md5sum</SPAN>(1)</SPAN>.</P></DD>
-     <DT><CODE>--no-hex</CODE></DT>
-     <DD>
-      <P><SPAN><I>This is the default.</I></SPAN> Use jigdo's own
-       Base64-like encoding of checksums.</P></DD>
-     <DT><CODE>--debug</CODE>[<SPAN>=<TT>help</TT>|=<TT>all</TT>|=<TT><I
-      >UNIT,~UNIT...</I></TT> </SPAN>]</DT>
-     <DD>
-      <P>Switch on or off debugging output. Just `--debug' is equivalent to
-       `--debug=all'. The argument is a comma-separated list of unit names
-       for which debugging output is to be enabled, or disabled if the name
-       is preceded by `~'. The special name `all' means all units. By
-       default, debugging output is switched off except for the units
-       `assert' and `general'. The exact list of available units for which
-       debugging can be switched on depends on whether jigdo was compiled
-       with debugging support - the list can be printed with
-       `--debug=help'.</P></DD>
-     <DT><TT><I>FILES</I></TT></DT>
-     <DD>
-      <P>Names of files or directories to use as input. These are the parts
-       that are contained in the image. In case one of the names is a
-       directory, the program recursively scans the directory and adds all
-       files contained in it. While doing this, it follows symbolic links,
-       but avoids symlink loops.</P>
-      <P>If one of the filenames starts with the character `-', you must
-       precede the list of files with `--'. A value of `-' has <SPAN><I
-       >no</I></SPAN> special meaning in this list, it stands for a file
-       whose name is a single hyphen.</P></DD></DL></DIV></DIV>
-  <DIV><A NAME="COMMANDS"></A>
-   <H2>COMMANDS</H2>
-   <P>The command name is the first non-option argument passed to <B
-    >jigdo-file</B>. Most commands have short abbreviations as well as long
-    names. <SPAN><I>The short command names should not be used in scripts -
-    there may be incompatible changes to them in the future!</I></SPAN></P
-   >
-   <DIV><A NAME="MAKE-TEMPLATE"></A>
-    <H3><B>make-template</B>, <B>mt</B></H3>
-    <P>Reads <TT><I>image</I></TT> and <TT><I>FILES</I></TT>, creates `<TT
-     >.jigdo</TT>' and `<TT>.template</TT>'. This is the main functionality
-     of <B>jigdo-file</B>.</P>
-    <P>It is possible to specify both <CODE>--image=-</CODE> and <CODE
-     >--files-from=-</CODE>. In this case, first the list of files is read
-     from standard input until an empty line is encountered. Everything
-     following it is assumed to be the image data. This can be useful if
-     you use <SPAN><SPAN>mkisofs</SPAN>(1)</SPAN> or similar programs that
-     can output the complete image on their standard output, because there
-     is no need to store the image on disc temporarily.</P>
-    <P>If a <TT><I>FILES</I></TT> argument contains the characters `<TT
-     >//</TT>' (Unix) or `<TT>\.\</TT>' (Windows), this has special
-     meaning. In the final jigdo file that users will download, each of the
-     parts is referenced in the `<TT>[Parts]</TT>' section with a URI of
-     the form `Label:some/filename'. (See `FORMAT OF .JIGDO FILES' below
-     for a detailed description.) The `<TT>[Servers]</TT>' section gives a
-     mapping of labels to servers on the internet, with lines like
-     `Label=http://myserver.org/jigdofiles/'. Using this information, <B
-     >jigdo</B> will create the final download URI for the part,
-     `http://myserver.org/jigdofiles/some/filename'. Specifying `<TT
-     >//</TT>' (or `<TT>\.\</TT>') in a file or directory name serves to
-     `cut off' the names at the right directory level. For example, if the
-     Unix path of one of your <TT><I>FILES</I></TT> is
-     `/path/some/filename', you can tell <B>jigdo-file</B> to cut off after
-     the `/path' by passing it the argument `/path//some/filename', or
-     `/path//' if you want the whole directory scanned. The path names need
-     not be absolute; `somedirectory//' is also possible.</P>
-    <P></P>
-    <DIV>
-     <DL>
-      <DT><CODE>--label <TT><I>Label=/path</I></TT></CODE></DT>
-      <DD>
-       <P>Specify a name to use as the label name for a path on disc.
-        (Influences the output jigdo file.) If you used `<TT>//</TT>' in
-        the <TT><I>FILES</I></TT> arguments as described above, <B
-        >jigdo-file</B> will by default pick label names automatically
-        (`A', `B' etc.). With this option, you can give labels more
-        meaningful names. Note that the label name will only be used if one
-        or more <TT><I>FILES</I></TT> begin with `/path//'.</P>
-       <P>Try to use label names that start with uppercase characters, to
-        disambiguate them clearly from protocol names like `http',
-        `ftp'.</P></DD>
-      <DT><CODE>--uri <TT><I>Label=http://some.server.org/</I></TT></CODE
-       ></DT>
-      <DD>
-       <P>By default, using <CODE>--label</CODE> as described above will
-        cause lines of the form `Label=file:/path/' to be written to the
-        `<TT>[Servers]</TT>' section of the output jigdo file. If you want
-        to override the `file:' URI so that the line reads
-        `Label=http://some.server.org/', you can do so by specifying <CODE
-        >--uri</CODE> along with <CODE>--label</CODE>. Giving just <CODE
-        >--uri <TT><I>Label=...</I></TT></CODE> without the corresponding
-        <CODE>--label <TT><I>Label=...</I></TT></CODE> has no effect, and
-        even if you specify both, an entry is only added to the `<TT
-        >[Servers]</TT>' section if the label is referenced by at least one
-        `<TT>[Parts]</TT>' entry.</P>
-       <P>The supplied value is not quoted by the program; if it contains
-        characters such as space or any of the characters <TT>#"'\</TT>
-        then you must quote it. (Under Unix, you may need to quote the
-        value twice to also protect it from the shell, e.g. <TT>\\\\</TT>
-        or <TT>'\\'</TT> to get a single backslash in the URI.)</P>
-       <P>The mapping specified with an <CODE>--uri</CODE> option is
-        ignored if it is already present in the output jigdo file.</P>
-       <P>Users of the Windows version may notice that the `<TT>\</TT>'
-        directory separators are converted into `<TT>/</TT>' in the `file:'
-        URIs that are generated by default. This is done to increase
-        cross-platform compatibility of `file:' - the <B>print-missing</B>
-        command of the Windows version will automatically re-convert the
-        characters when it prints the URIs. In case you supply your own
-        `file:' URIs under Windows using <CODE>--uri</CODE>, you must also
-        exchange `<TT>/</TT>' and `<TT>\</TT>'.</P></DD>
-      <DT><CODE>-0</CODE> to <CODE>-9</CODE></DT>
-      <DD>
-       <P>Set amount of compression in the output template file, from <CODE
-        >-0</CODE> (no compression) to <CODE>-9</CODE> (maximum
-        compression). The default is <CODE>-9</CODE>, which can make the
-        template generation quite slow. By default, the compression
-        algorithm used is the same as for <SPAN><SPAN>gzip</SPAN>(1)</SPAN
-        >.</P></DD>
-      <DT><CODE>--gzip</CODE> and <CODE>--bzip2</CODE></DT>
-      <DD>
-       <P>Choose between the gzip and bzip2 compression algorithms. The
-        default is gzip. Bzip2 usually gives a better compression ratio,
-        but compression is significantly slower than with gzip.</P></DD>
-      <DT><CODE>--min-length=<TT><I>BYTES</I></TT></CODE></DT>
-      <DD>
-       <P>Set minimum length of a part for <B>jigdo-file</B> to look for it
-        in the image. The default is 1k. Parts smaller than this will never
-        be found in the image, so their data will be included in the
-        template file. The search algorithm used requires such a minimum
-        length, otherwise template generation could become extremely slow.
-        If you know for sure that all your <TT><I>FILES</I></TT> are larger
-        than a certain amount, you can increase <B>jigdo-file</B>'s speed
-        slightly by specifying the amount with this option. There is a
-        hard-wired absolute minimum of 256 bytes - anything lower will
-        silently be set to 256.</P></DD>
-      <DT><CODE>--merge=<TT><I>FILE</I></TT></CODE></DT>
-      <DD>
-       <P>Include the contents of <TT><I>FILE</I></TT> in the output `<TT
-        >.jigdo</TT>' file. The file can contain data which you want added
-        to the output (for example, a `<TT>[Servers]</TT>' section with a
-        list of your servers as entries), or it can be the jigdo file
-        output by an earlier run of <B>jigdo-file</B>.</P>
-       <P>It is possible to specify the same file for input with <CODE
-        >--merge</CODE> and for output with <CODE>--jigdo</CODE>. However,
-        you will also need to use <CODE>--force</CODE> to make the program
-        overwrite the old version of the jigdo file with the new one. <TT
-        ><I>FILE</I></TT> can be `-' for standard input.</P>
-       <P>When <SPAN><I>adding</I></SPAN> new information to the supplied
-        file, <B>jigdo-file</B> will not insert new lines into the `<TT
-        >[Parts]</TT>' section if an entry for the same MD5 checksum (but
-        not necessarily with the same URI!) already exists, and it will not
-        insert new lines into the `<TT>[Servers]</TT>' section if a
-        completely identical entry already exists.</P>
-       <P>When <SPAN><I>reading in</I></SPAN> the existing <TT><I>FILE</I
-        ></TT>, the behaviour is slightly different: The program <SPAN><I
-        >preserves</I></SPAN> entries in the `<TT>[Parts]</TT>' section
-        with identical checksum, but different URIs. For completely
-        identical entries (same checksum and URI), only one entry is
-        preserved and the duplicates are removed. The `<TT>[Servers]</TT>'
-        section is left untouched.</P></DD>
-      <DT><CODE>--image-section</CODE></DT>
-      <DD>
-       <P><SPAN><I>This is the default.</I></SPAN> Causes <B>jigdo-file</B
-        > to add an `<TT>[Image]</TT>' section to the `<TT>.jigdo</TT>'
-        file.</P>
-       <P>As an exception, a new `<TT>[Image]</TT>' section is <SPAN><I
-        >not</I></SPAN> added if you use <CODE>--merge</CODE> and the file
-        to merge contains an `<TT>[Image]</TT>' section with a line which
-        reads `<TT>Template-MD5Sum=</TT>' (end of line after the `='). In
-        this case, the generated template data's MD5 checksum value is just
-        added after the `=' of the first line of this form in the file - no
-        whole new `<TT>[Image]</TT>' section is appended. This behaviour is
-        useful because it allows you to pass via <CODE>--merge</CODE> an
-        `<TT>[Image]</TT>' section with arbitrary content and then have the
-        MD5 checksum automatically added by <B>jigdo-file</B>. The section
-        `FORMAT OF .JIGDO FILES' below explains the `<TT>[Image]</TT>'
-        section contents in greater detail.</P></DD>
-      <DT><CODE>--no-image-section</CODE></DT>
-      <DD>
-       <P>Do <SPAN><I>not</I></SPAN> include an `<TT>[Image]</TT>' section
-        in the `<TT>.jigdo</TT>' file. You need to add one yourself if you
-        use this option. However, doing that is not easy (you also need to
-        add a `<TT>Template-MD5Sum</TT>' line with the correct checksum, or
-        <B>jigdo</B> will complain), so use of this option is
-        discouraged.</P></DD>
-      <DT><CODE>--servers-section</CODE></DT>
-      <DD>
-       <P><SPAN><I>This is the default.</I></SPAN> Causes <B>jigdo-file</B
-        > to add a `<TT>[Servers]</TT>' section to the `<TT>.jigdo</TT>'
-        file. This default section uses `file:' URIs, which allows for
-        immediate reassembly of the image from the local filesystem, and is
-        also useful if you want to edit the file manually and replace the
-        `file:' URIs with other URIs.</P></DD>
-      <DT><CODE>--no-servers-section</CODE></DT>
-      <DD>
-       <P>Do <SPAN><I>not</I></SPAN> add a `<TT>[Servers]</TT>' section at
-        the end of the `<TT>.jigdo</TT>' file. Useful e.g. if you are going
-        to append the section with a script.</P></DD>
-      <DT><CODE>--match-exec=<TT><I>SHELLCOMMAND</I></TT></CODE></DT>
-      <DD>
-       <P>Whenever a file is found in the image, execute the supplied
-        command string by passing it to a shell. <B>jigdo-file</B> sets up
-        a number of environment variables with information about the file
-        match. For example, if the file `<TT>/path//a/b/file</TT>' was
-        found in the image and `Label:a/b/file' is going to be written to
-        the `<TT>.jigdo</TT>' file:
-        <P></P><UL><LI>
-        <P><CODE>LABEL</CODE>="<TT>Label</TT>" - Name of the label for the
-         file. The example assumes that `<CODE>--label</CODE> <TT
-         >Label=/path</TT>' was specified by you. In the absence of such an
-         option, <CODE>LABEL</CODE> will be set but empty.</P></LI><LI>
-        <P><CODE>LABELPATH</CODE>="<TT>/path/</TT>" - The path
-         corresponding to the label, or in other words, the prefix of the
-         matched file's path that will <SPAN><I>not</I></SPAN> appear in
-         the output `<TT>.jigdo</TT>' file. Is set even without any `<CODE
-         >--label</CODE>' option present. Ends with a slash.</P></LI><LI>
-        <P><CODE>MATCHPATH</CODE>="<TT>a/b/</TT>" - The rest of the path,
-         without the leafname of the matched file. Is either empty or ends
-         with a slash.</P></LI><LI>
-        <P><CODE>LEAF</CODE>="<TT>file</TT>" - The leafname of the matched
-         file.</P></LI><LI>
-        <P><CODE>MD5SUM</CODE>="<TT>lNVdUSqbo2yqm33webrhnw</TT>" - The
-         md5sum of the matched file, in Base64-like format.</P></LI><LI>
-        <P><CODE>FILE</CODE>="<TT>/path//a/b/file</TT>" - For convenience,
-         the complete path of the file. The variable is always set to <TT
-         >$LABELPATH$MATCHPATH$LEAF</TT>.</P></LI></UL> </P>
-       <P>Please be careful to correctly quote the string passed to this
-        option, otherwise your supplied command will not work with
-        filenames that contain spaces. As an example, to create a backup of
-        hard links to the matched files, use the following option: <TT
-        >--match-exec='mkdir -p "${LABEL:-.}/$MATCHPATH" &#38;&#38; ln -f
-        "$FILE" "${LABEL:-.}/$MATCHPATH$LEAF"'</TT> </P>
-       <P>By default, no command is executed. Use --match-exec="" to remove
-        a command string which was set with an earlier use of this
-        option.</P></DD>
-      <DT><CODE>--greedy-matching</CODE></DT>
-      <DD>
-       <P><SPAN><I>This is the default.</I></SPAN> Imagine that your image
-        contains a <TT>.tar</TT> file which in turn contains another file
-        <TT>x</TT>, and that you provide both the <TT>.tar</TT> and the
-        files inside it on the command line. When <B>jigdo-file</B> scans
-        the image, it encounters the beginning of the <TT>.tar</TT> file,
-        and then the file <TT>x</TT>.</P>
-       <P>At this point, a decision must be made: Should the smaller file
-        <TT>x</TT> be recorded as matched, or should it be ignored in
-        favour of the larger (and thus better) match of the <TT>.tar</TT>
-        file? Unfortunately, at this point it is not clear whether there
-        will actually be a full match of the <TT>.tar</TT>, so by default,
-        the program prefers the small match.</P></DD>
-      <DT><CODE>--no-greedy-matching</CODE></DT>
-      <DD>
-       <P>In the case where a large partial match is present and a shorter
-        match has been confirmed, ignore the small match. (See the option
-        above.)</P></DD></DL></DIV></DIV>
-   <DIV><A NAME="MAKE-IMAGE"></A>
-    <H3><B>make-image</B>, <B>mi</B></H3>
-    <P>Reads `<TT>.template</TT>' and <TT><I>FILES</I></TT>, creates <TT
-     ><I>image</I></TT> (or `<TT>imagename.tmp</TT>'). Provides a
-     rudimentary way of reassembling images - <B>jigdo</B> is usually
-     better suited for this task. However, in contrast to <B>jigdo</B>, no
-     `<TT>.jigdo</TT>' file is required.</P>
-    <P>If the image is to be written to a file (and not to standard
-     output), it is possible to create the image in several steps, with
-     several invocations of `<B>jigdo-file make-image</B>', as follows: You
-     first invoke <B>jigdo-file</B>, specifying as many files as are
-     available at this time. The program scans the files, and those that
-     are contained in the image are copied to a temporary file, whose name
-     is formed by appending `<TT>.tmp</TT>' to the image filename.</P>
-    <P>For all further files which could be parts of the image, you repeat
-     this process. As soon as all parts are present, the temporary file
-     will be truncated slightly (to delete some administrative data that <B
-     >jigdo-file</B> appends at the end) and renamed to the final image
-     name. The possibility of reassembling the image in several steps is
-     especially useful for gathering files from removable media, e.g.
-     several older CDs.</P>
-    <P>Scripts using <B>make-image</B> can detect whether image creation is
-     complete by checking the exit status: 0 signals successful creation,
-     whereas 1 means that more files need to be supplied. Other errors
-     result in an exit status of 2 (`recoverable', e.g. file not found) or
-     3 (non-recoverable, e.g. write error).</P>
-    <P></P>
-    <DIV>
-     <DL>
-      <DT><CODE>--check-files</CODE></DT>
-      <DD>
-       <P><SPAN><I>This is the default.</I></SPAN> Whenever any part is
-        copied to the image, re-check its checksum against the checksum
-        stored in the template. It is recommended that you leave this
-        switched on, even if it slows down image creation a bit.</P></DD>
-      <DT><CODE>--no-check-files</CODE></DT>
-      <DD>
-       <P>Do not check files' checksums when copying them to the image.
-        This can be safely used when no cache file is used (which means
-        that files will be written to the image immediately after being
-        scanned) or the whole image is checked later with the <B>verify</B
-        > command.</P></DD></DL></DIV></DIV>
-   <DIV><A NAME="PRINT-MISSING"></A>
-    <H3><B>print-missing</B>, <B>pm</B></H3>
-    <P>Reads `<TT>.jigdo</TT>', `<TT>.template</TT>' and (if present) `<TT
-     >imagename.tmp</TT>', outputs a list of URIs still needed to
-     completely reassemble the image.</P>
-    <P>Together with the <B>make-image</B> command, this provides most of
-     the functionality of <B>jigdo</B> on the command line.</P>
-    <P>For each part that is not yet present in the temporary image file,
-     the file checksum is looked up in the `<TT>[Parts]</TT>' section of
-     the jigdo file. Any label in the corresponding entry is then expanded
-     according to the label definitions in the `<TT>[Servers]</TT>' section
-     and printed on standard output. <B>jigdo</B> allows you to specify
-     several alternative locations for each label in this section, but <B
-     >print-missing</B> will only output the first one for each missing
-     part.</P>
-    <P>If the checksum cannot be found in the `<TT>[Parts]</TT>' section
-     (this Should Not Happen unless you deleted that section), a lookup is
-     instead made for `MD5Sum:<TT><I>&lt;checksum&gt;</I></TT>', just like
-     with <B>jigdo</B>. (Thus, if you want to get rid of the `<TT
-     >[Parts]</TT>' section, you can do so if you rename each part to its
-     own checksum.)</P>
-    <P></P>
-    <DIV>
-     <DL>
-      <DT><CODE>--uri <TT><I>Label=http://some.server.org/</I></TT></CODE
-       ></DT>
-      <DD>
-       <P>Override the entries in the `<TT>.jigdo</TT>' file for any label
-        with a URI of your choice. With the example above, a `<TT
-        >[Parts]</TT>' entry of `Label:some/filename' will cause the line
-        `http://some.server.org/some/filename' to be printed.</P>
-       <P>The supplied value is not quoted by the program; if it contains
-        characters such as space or any of the characters <TT>#"'\</TT>
-        then you must quote it. (Under Unix, you may need to quote the
-        value twice to also protect it from the shell, e.g. <TT>\\\\</TT>
-        or <TT>'\\'</TT> to get a single backslash in the URI.)</P></DD
-      ></DL></DIV></DIV>
-   <DIV><A NAME="PRINT-MISSING-ALL"></A>
-    <H3><B>print-missing-all</B>, <B>pma</B></H3>
-    <P>Just like <B>print-missing</B>, this command outputs a list of URIs
-     still needed to completely reassemble the image. However, <SPAN><I
-     >all</I></SPAN> alternative download locations are printed instead of
-     just one. In the output, the URIs for a file are separated from other
-     files' URIs with blank lines. The <CODE>--uri</CODE> option has the
-     same effect as for <B>print-missing</B>.</P></DIV>
-   <DIV><A NAME="VERIFY"></A>
-    <H3><B>verify</B>, <B>ver</B></H3>
-    <P>Reads <TT><I>image</I></TT> (presumably generated with <B
-     >make-image</B>) and `<TT>.template</TT>', checks for correct checksum
-     of image.</P>
-    <P>The template data does not only contain checksums of the individual
-     parts, but also of the image as a whole. <B>make-image</B> already
-     performs a number of internal checks, but if you like, you can
-     additionally check the image with this command.</P></DIV>
-   <DIV><A NAME="SCAN"></A>
-    <H3><B>scan</B>, <B>sc</B></H3>
-    <P>Reads all the <TT><I>FILES</I></TT> and enters them into the cache,
-     unless they are already cached. The <CODE>--cache</CODE> option must
-     be present for this command.</P>
-    <P></P>
-    <DIV>
-     <DL>
-      <DT><CODE>--no-scan-whole-file</CODE></DT>
-      <DD>
-       <P><SPAN><I>This is the default.</I></SPAN> This only causes the
-        first <CODE>--md5-block-size</CODE> bytes of each file to be read.
-        If the cache is used later by <B>jigdo-file make-image</B>, the
-        rest of the file will be read once these first bytes are recognized
-        in the input image.</P></DD>
-      <DT><CODE>--scan-whole-file</CODE></DT>
-      <DD>
-       <P>Immediately read the entire file contents and store them in the
-        cache.</P></DD></DL></DIV></DIV>
-   <DIV><A NAME="MD5SUM"></A>
-    <H3><B>md5sum</B>, <B>md5</B></H3>
-    <P>Reads all the <TT><I>FILES</I></TT> and prints out MD5 checksums of
-     their contents. This command is quite similar to <SPAN><SPAN
-     >md5sum</SPAN>(1)</SPAN>, except that the checksum is output in the
-     Base64-like encoding which is also used elsewhere by <B>jigdo-file</B
-     >.</P>
-    <P>The <TT><I>FILES</I></TT> arguments are processed in the same way as
-     with the other commands, which means that recursion automatically
-     takes place for any arguments that are directories, and that symbolic
-     links are not listed except when the file(s) they point to are not
-     reachable directly.</P>
-    <P>In the checksum list printed on standard output, only the part of
-     the filename following any `<TT>//</TT>' (or `<TT>\.\</TT>' on
-     Windows) is printed. Any <CODE>--cache</CODE> will be used for
-     querying files' MD5 checksums and/or writing the checksums of scanned
-     files.</P></DIV>
-   <DIV><A NAME="LIST-TEMPLATE"></A>
-    <H3><B>list-template</B>, <B>ls</B></H3>
-    <P>Reads a `<TT>.template</TT>' file and outputs low-level information
-     about the image and all parts contained in it, including offset,
-     length and checksum.</P>
-    <P>You can also use this command with temporary image files (by
-     specifying something like <CODE>--template=imagename.tmp</CODE>) - in
-     that case, the output also distinguishes between parts that have been
-     written to the image and parts that haven't.</P>
-    <P>The exact output format may change incompatibly between different
-     jigdo releases. The following different types of lines can be output.
-     `have-file' only occurs for `<TT>.tmp</TT>' files, indicating a file
-     that has already been successfully written to the temporary file:</P><PRE>in-template  <TT><I
->offset-in-image  length</I
-></TT
->
-need-file    <TT><I
->offset-in-image  length  file-md5sum  filestart-rsyncsum</I
-></TT
->
-have-file    <TT><I
->offset-in-image  length  file-md5sum  filestart-rsyncsum</I
-></TT
->
-image-info   <TT><I
->image-length  image-md5sum  rsyncsum-size</I
-></TT
-></PRE></DIV></DIV>
-  <DIV><A NAME="DETAILS"></A>
-   <H2>DETAILS</H2>
-   <P>Jigsaw Download was created with the format of ISO9660 CD images in
-    mind - however, the following also applies to many other filesystem
-    formats, as well as to `tar' archives and uncompressed `zip' archives.
-    A CD image contains both information for organizing the filesystem
-    (header with disc name etc., ISO9660 directory data, data of extensions
-    such as Joliet or RockRidge, zero padding) and the files contained on
-    the CD. An important property that jigdo relies on is that each file is
-    stored in one contiguous section of the image; it is not split into two
-    or more parts.</P>
-   <P>When <B>jigdo-file</B> is given a number of files that might be
-    contained in an image, it detects whether any of the files are present
-    using a `rolling checksum' inspired by the one used by <SPAN><SPAN
-    >rsync</SPAN>(1)</SPAN>. The resulting data is written to the `<TT
-    >.template</TT>' file: If a section of the image could not be matched
-    (e.g. it was directory information), the data is compressed and written
-    directly to the template. However, if a matching file was found, its
-    data is omitted from the template. Instead, only a reference (an MD5
-    checksum of the file) is inserted in the template.</P>
-   <P>Note that the template data only contains binary data, it does not
-    contain any filenames or URIs, since it cannot be easily edited in case
-    any of these values need to be changed. All that information is stored
-    in the `<TT>.jigdo</TT>' file, a text file to which you can add URLs
-    for your server(s). The jigdo file provides a mapping for each MD5
-    checksum to one or more alternative download locations for the
-    corresponding part.</P>
-   <P>Apart from the mapping of MD5 sums to URIs, the jigdo file also
-    contains an URI pointing to a download location for the template file.
-    This way, the <B>jigdo</B> download tool only needs to be given one URI
-    (that of the `<TT>.jigdo</TT>' file) to be able to download and
-    reassemble the complete image.</P></DIV>
-  <DIV><A NAME="JIGDO-FORMAT"></A>
-   <H2>FORMAT OF .JIGDO FILES</H2>
-   <P>The overall format of `<TT>.jigdo</TT>' files follows that of `<TT
-    >.ini</TT>' files, as also used by the Gnome and KDE projects for some
-    data. The file is organized into sections, each of which is preceded by
-    a line reading `<TT>[Sectionname]</TT>'. Within each section, lines
-    have the form `Label=Value'. Such lines are also called `entries'
-    below. All `<TT>.jigdo</TT>' files use UTF-8 as their character
-    encoding.</P>
-   <P>Comments are introduced with the `<TT>#</TT>' character and extend to
-    the end of the line. Whitespace is ignored at line start and end as
-    well as to the left and right of section names and the `<TT>=</TT>' in
-    entries. Furthermore, the jigdo utilities split up the text of the
-    entry value (i.e. the part after the `<TT>=</TT>') into
-    whitespace-separated words, much like the Unix shell. Single <TT
-    >''</TT> and double <TT>""</TT> quotes can be used to prevent that e.g.
-    URIs containing whitespace are split apart. Similarly, characters with
-    special meaning (the characters <TT>'"#\</TT> and space/tab) must be
-    quoted with <TT>\</TT> to appear in the value. As with the shell, there
-    is a difference between <TT>'&nbsp;'</TT> and <TT>"&nbsp;"</TT>: Within
-    <TT>'&nbsp;'</TT>, the characters <TT>"#\</TT> and whitespace lose
-    their special meaning and become ordinary characters, whereas within
-    <TT>"&nbsp;"</TT>, only the characters <TT>'#</TT> and whitespace lose
-    their special meaning - in other words, backslash escapes still work
-    inside <TT>"&nbsp;"</TT>, but not <TT>'&nbsp;'</TT>.</P>
-   <P>`<TT>.jigdo</TT>' files can optionally be compressed with <SPAN
-    ><SPAN>gzip</SPAN>(1)</SPAN>. <B>jigdo-file</B> always outputs
-    uncompressed files, which you can compress yourself. <B>jigdo-lite</B>
-    supports single uncompressed and compressed files.</P>
-   <P>(Behaviour which may change in the future and which should not be
-    relied upon: <B>jigdo</B> additionally supports any number of
-    concatenated plaintext and gzipped parts in the files - for example,
-    you can compress a `<TT>.jigdo</TT>' file and then add a couple of
-    lines of uncompressed data to the end.)</P>
-   <P>In all cases, the `<TT>.gz</TT>' extension should be removed from the
-    filename - the tools will determine automatically from the file
-    contents whether a file is compressed or not.</P>
-   <P>Below is a description of the individual section names used by
-    jigdo.</P>
-   <DIV><A NAME="JIGDO-SECTION"></A>
-    <H3>Jigdo section</H3><PRE>[Jigdo]
-Version=1.1
-Generator=jigdo-file/1.0.0</PRE>
-    <P>Information about the version of the jigdo file format used, and the
-     program that generated it. There should be one such section per `<TT
-     >.jigdo</TT>' file.</P></DIV>
-   <DIV><A NAME="IMAGE-SECTION"></A>
-    <H3>Image section</H3><PRE>[Image]
-Filename=<TT><I
->"filename for saving on user's disc"</I
-></TT
->
-Template=<TT><I
->"URI where to fetch template file"</I
-></TT
->
-Template-MD5Sum=OQ8riqT1BuyzsrT9964A7g
-ShortInfo=<TT><I
->single-line description of the image (200 characters max.)</I
-></TT
->
-Info=<TT><I
->long description (5000 characters max.)</I
-></TT
-></PRE>
-    <P>The value for the `Template' entry can be either an URL (absolute or
-     relative to the URL of the jigdo file) or a string of the form `<TT
-     ><I>Label</I></TT>:<TT><I>pathname</I></TT>' (<SPAN><I
-     >UNIMPLEMENTED</I></SPAN>), as described below.</P>
-    <P>The `Template-MD5Sum' entry is added by <B>jigdo-file</B> and
-     specifies the MD5 checksum of the generated `<TT>.template</TT>' file.
-     It is used by <B>jigdo</B> to detect cases where the downloaded
-     template data is corrupted or belongs to a different image.</P>
-    <P>Unlike other entry values, the values of the `<TT>ShortInfo</TT>'
-     and `<TT>Info</TT>' entries are <SPAN><I>not</I></SPAN> split up into
-     words, instead all quoting is preserved.</P>
-    <P>The value of the `<TT>Info</TT>' entry is special in that <SPAN
-     ><SPAN>jigdo</SPAN>(1)</SPAN> can optionally parse XML markup it
-     contains. If the markup has errors such as unbalanced/unsupported
-     tags, the string is displayed literally, without XML parsing.
-     Supported tags are <TT>&lt;b&gt;&lt;/b&gt;</TT> (bold), <TT
-     >&lt;i&gt;&lt;/i&gt;</TT> (italic), <TT>&lt;tt&gt;&lt;/tt&gt;</TT>
-     (typewriter font), <TT>&lt;u&gt;&lt;/u&gt;</TT> (underline), <TT
-     >&lt;big&gt;&lt;/big&gt;</TT> (larger font), <TT
-     >&lt;small&gt;&lt;/small&gt;</TT> (smaller font) and <TT
-     >&lt;br/&gt;</TT> (linebreak). Supported entities include <TT
-     >&amp;lt;</TT> (`&lt;'), <TT>&amp;gt;</TT> (`&gt;') and <TT
-     >&amp;amp;</TT> (`&amp;'). Note that the whole `<TT>Info</TT>' entry
-     must be on one line in the jigdo file.</P>
-    <P>This section may occur multiple times, but all except the first one
-     will be ignored. This is useful e.g. when creating a `<TT>.jigdo</TT
-     >' file for a DVD image when you already have `<TT>.jigdo</TT>' files
-     for CDs with the same content: You can simply `<TT>[Include]</TT>'
-     (see below) the CDs' jigdo files at the end of the DVD jigdo file,
-     after its `<TT>[Image]</TT>' section.</P></DIV>
-   <DIV><A NAME="PARTS-SECTION"></A>
-    <H3>Parts section</H3><PRE>[Parts]
-xJNkjrq8NYMraeGavUpllw=LabelA:part0
-GoTResP2EC6Lb_2wTsqOoQ=LabelA:part1
-kyfebwu6clbYqqWUdFIyaw=LabelB:some/path/part2
--J9UAimo0Bqg9c0oOXI1mQ=http://some.where.com/part3</PRE>
-    <P>All lines in the section, which provides the mapping from MD5
-     checksums to URIs, have the same format: On the left side of the `<TT
-     >=</TT>' the checksum (encoded with a Base64-like encoding) is given,
-     and on the right a string corresponding to the part with this
-     checksum; either a complete URI or a string of the form `<TT><I
-     >Label</I></TT>:<TT><I>pathname</I></TT>', which is expanded into one
-     or more URIs by looking up the definition(s) for the <TT><I>Label</I
-     ></TT> in the `<TT>[Servers]</TT>' section.</P>
-    <P>In case a particular MD5 checksum cannot be found in any `<TT
-     >[Parts]</TT>' section by <B>jigdo</B>, the program will perform a
-     lookup for `<TT>MD5Sum:</TT><TT><I>&lt;checksum&gt;</I></TT>', e.g.
-     for `<TT>MD5Sum:xJNkjrq8NYMraeGavUpllw</TT>' if you deleted the line
-     for `part0' above.</P>
-    <P>A checksum appearing multiple times in this section indicates
-     alternative download locations for the part.</P>
-    <P>There may be any number of `<TT>[Parts]</TT>' sections in the file;
-     they are all considered when looking up MD5 checksums.</P>
-    <P><B>jigdo-file</B> always puts the `<TT>[Parts]</TT>' section at the
-     end of the file, and it even rearranges any file specified with <CODE
-     >--merge</CODE> to have only one such section at the end. This is done
-     to allow <B>jigdo</B> to display the information from the `<TT
-     >[Image]</TT>' section while the rest of that file is still being
-     downloaded.</P></DIV>
-   <DIV><A NAME="SERVERS-SECTION"></A>
-    <H3>Servers section</H3><PRE>[Servers]
-LabelA=http://myserver.org/
-LabelA=ftp://mirror.myserver.org/
-LabelB=LabelC:subdirectory/
-LabelC=http://some.where.com/jigdo/</PRE>
-    <P>All lines in the section, which provides the mapping from server
-     labels to server locations, have the same format: On the left side of
-     the `<TT>=</TT>' the label name is given, and on the right the value
-     to expand the label name to.</P>
-    <P>A label name appearing multiple times in this section indicates
-     alternative download locations for the parts that use the label in the
-     `<TT>[Parts]</TT>' section. This notation makes it very easy to add
-     mirrors to the jigdo file.</P>
-    <P>As shown by the example above, the label values may themselves
-     reference other labels. In this case, the entry
-     `LabelB:some/path/part2' in the `<TT>[Parts]</TT>' section will expand
-     to `http://some.where.com/jigdo/subdirectory/some/path/part2'. Loops
-     in the label definitions result in undefined behaviour and must be
-     avoided.</P>
-    <P>There may be any number of `<TT>[Servers]</TT>' sections in the
-     file; they are all considered when looking up labels. Either of `<TT
-     >[Parts]</TT>' or `<TT>[Servers]</TT>', but not both, can be omitted
-     from the jigdo file.</P></DIV>
-   <DIV><A NAME="COMMENT-SECTION"></A>
-    <H3>Comment section</H3><PRE>[Comment]
-Any text, except that lines must not begin with `['.</PRE>
-    <P>All text following a `<TT>[Comment]</TT>' or `<TT>[comment]</TT>'
-     line is ignored, up to the next line with a section label.</P></DIV>
-   <DIV><A NAME="INCLUDE"></A>
-    <H3>Include directive</H3><PRE>[Include http://some.url/file.jigdo]</PRE
-    >
-    <P>Lines of this form cause the content of the specified jigdo file to
-     be downloaded and parsed just like the main jigdo file. The effect
-     will be the same as copying the included file's contents into the file
-     which contains the include directive. (Exception: Any relative URLs
-     are always resolved using the URL of the `<TT>.jigdo</TT>' file that
-     contains that relative URL.)</P>
-    <P>The URL argument can be an absolute or relative URL. Relative URLs
-     are assumed to be relative to the URL of the jigdo file which contains
-     the include directive. Includes can be nested, but it is an error to
-     create a loop of include directives. It is <SPAN><I>not</I></SPAN>
-     possible to use URLs of the form `<TT><I>Label</I></TT>:<TT><I
-     >pathname</I></TT>'.</P>
-    <P>The URL cannot be quoted with "". Any `<TT>]</TT>' characters in the
-     argument must be escaped as `<TT>%5D</TT>', and any spaces as `<TT
-     >%20</TT>'.</P>
-    <P>Include directives are only supported by <B>jigdo</B>, they are
-     ignored by <B>jigdo-lite</B>.</P>
-    <P>An include directive terminates any previous section, but it does
-     not start a new one. In other words, a new section must always be
-     started after the include line, <B>jigdo</B> does not allow normal
-     entries to appear below the `<TT>[Include]</TT>'.</P></DIV></DIV>
-  <DIV><A NAME="CACHE-FILES"></A>
-   <H2>CACHE FILES</H2>
-   <P>Any file specified with the <CODE>--cache</CODE> option is used to
-    store information about the <TT><I>FILES</I></TT> presented to <B
-    >jigdo-file</B>. When querying the cache, a file is considered
-    unchanged (and the cached data is used) only if filename, file size and
-    last modification time (mtime) match exactly. For the filename match,
-    not the entire file name is used, but only the part following any `<TT
-    >//</TT>', so that any changes to the part before the `<TT>//</TT>'
-    will not invalidate the cache.</P>
-   <P>Old cache entries are removed from the cache if they have not been
-    read from or written to for the amount of time specified with <CODE
-    >--cache-expiry</CODE>. Entries are <SPAN><I>not</I></SPAN> immediately
-    removed from the cache if the file they refer to no longer exists -
-    this makes it possible to cache information about files on removable
-    media.</P>
-   <P>Cache expiry only takes place <SPAN><I>after</I></SPAN> <B
-    >jigdo-file</B> has done its main work - if any old entries are
-    accessed before expiry takes place, they will be kept. For example, if
-    the program is run using the default expiry time of 30 days, but
-    accesses a cache file with entries generated 2 months ago, then entries
-    in that cache <SPAN><I>will</I></SPAN> be considered, and only those
-    cache entries that were not needed during the program run will be
-    expired.</P>
-   <P>Due to a peculiarity of the underlying database library (libdb3),
-    cache files never shrink, they only grow. If a large number of entries
-    was expired from your cache file and you want it to shrink, you can
-    either just delete it (of course then everything will have to be
-    regenerated) or use the utilities accompanying libdb3 to dump and
-    restore the database, with a command like `<B>db3_dump <TT><I
-    >old-cache.db</I></TT> | db3_load <TT><I>new-cache.db</I></TT></B>'.
-    <SPAN><SPAN>For Debian, these programs are supplied in the package
-    `libdb3-util'.</SPAN></SPAN></P>
-   <P>If a different <CODE>--md5-block-size</CODE> is specified, the entire
-    file needs to be re-read to update its cache entry. If a different
-    <CODE>--min-length</CODE> is specified, only the first `md5-block-size'
-    bytes of the file need to be re-read.</P></DIV>
-  <DIV><A NAME="EXAMPLES"></A>
-   <H2>EXAMPLES</H2>
-   <DIV><A NAME="EX-CDIMAGE"></A>
-    <H3>Preparing your CD image for distribution</H3>
-    <P>You have created a CD image `<TT>image.iso</TT>' from some of the
-     files stored in the directory `<TT>/home/ftp</TT>' on your harddisc,
-     which is also available online as `ftp://mysite.org'. As you don't
-     want to waste space by effectively hosting the same data twice (once
-     as files on the FTP server, once inside the image), and you are fed up
-     with users' downloads aborting after 200MB and their restarting the
-     download dozens of times, you decide to use jigdo. How do you prepare
-     the image for download?</P>
-    <P>In fact, only one command is necessary: <A NAME="AEN799"></A
-     ><BLOCKQUOTE>
-     <P><B>jigdo-file make-template --image=image.iso
-      --jigdo=/home/ftp/image.jigdo --template=/home/ftp/image.template
-      /home/ftp// --label Mysite=/home/ftp --uri
-      Mysite=ftp://mysite.org/</B></P></BLOCKQUOTE> </P>
-    <P>People can now point <B>jigdo</B> at `ftp://mysite.org/image.jigdo'
-     to download your image. The template file needs to be accessible as
-     `ftp://mysite.org/image.template'.</P>
-    <P>Note that nothing prevents you from doing the same for an FTP server
-     that isn't administrated by you - in that case, you only need to host
-     the `<TT>.jigdo</TT>' and `<TT>.template</TT>' files on your own
-     server/homepage.</P></DIV>
-   <DIV><A NAME="EX-LARGEFILE"></A>
-    <H3>Preparing an arbitrary large file for distribution</H3>
-    <P>We assume that you have a large file that is not a filesystem, e.g.
-     `<TT>movie.mpeg</TT>'. Because of space problems, you want to
-     distribute the data on two servers.</P>
-    <P>In this case, the parts of the image need to be generated
-     artificially with the <B>split</B> command. For example, to create
-     chunks of 4MB each, use `<B>split -b 4m movie.mpeg part</B>'. Copy the
-     resulting files `<TT>part<TT><I>XX</I></TT></TT>' into two directories
-     `<TT>1</TT>' and `<TT>2</TT>' that you create, according to how you
-     want the files distributed between the servers. Next, create the jigdo
-     and template files with `<B>jigdo-file make-template
-     --image=movie.mpeg 1// 2//</B>'. You will need to edit the `<TT
-     >.jigdo</TT>' file and provide the right URIs for the two servers that
-     you are going to upload the `<TT>part<TT><I>XX</I></TT></TT>' files
-     to.</P></DIV>
-   <DIV><A NAME="EX-CUSTOMIZE"></A>
-    <H3>Customized versions of images</H3>
-    <P>Because it is possible to assign a different URI for each part of an
-     image if necessary, jigdo is very flexible. Only one example is the
-     possibility of customized versions of images: Suppose that someone is
-     distributing a CD image, and that you want to make a few small changes
-     to it and redistribute your own version. You download the `<TT
-     >official.iso</TT>' CD image with <B>jigdo</B> (passing it the URL of
-     `<TT>official.jigdo</TT>'), write it to CD-R, make your changes (say,
-     adding files from the `<TT>myfiles</TT>' directory on your harddisc)
-     and produce your own version, `<TT>myversion.iso</TT>'. Next, you
-     instruct <B>jigdo-file</B> to create the jigdo and template files for
-     your modified image, using the command <A NAME="AEN831"></A
-     ><BLOCKQUOTE>
-     <P><B>jigdo-file make-template --image=myversion.iso /mnt/cdrom/
-      myfiles// --label My=myfiles/ --uri My=http://my.homepage.net/
-      --merge=official.jigdo</B></P></BLOCKQUOTE> while `<TT
-     >official.iso</TT>' is mounted under `<TT>/mnt/cdrom</TT>'. By using
-     <CODE>--merge</CODE>, you have told <B>jigdo-file</B> to take the
-     contents of `<TT>official.jigdo</TT>', add to it a new `<TT
-     >[Image]</TT>' section for `<TT>myversion.iso</TT>' and write the
-     resulting jigdo file to `<TT>myversion.jigdo</TT>' - so now `<TT
-     >myversion.jigdo</TT>' offers two images for download, the original
-     version and your modified version. (If you do not want it to offer the
-     official version, edit it and remove the `<TT>[Image]</TT>' section
-     that lists `<TT>official.iso</TT>'.)</P>
-    <P>Now you can upload the `<TT>.jigdo</TT>' file, the `<TT
-     >.template</TT>' file and also the files in `<TT>myfiles</TT>' to
-     `http://my.homepage.net/'. Thus, for people to download your modified
-     image, you do <SPAN><I>not</I></SPAN> need to upload the complete
-     image contents to your web space, but only the changes you made!</P>
-    <P>(In case you only made very few changes, you could also omit the
-     `myfiles' parameter in the command above, then all your changes end up
-     in the new template file.)</P></DIV>
-   <DIV><A NAME="EX-COMBINE"></A>
-    <H3>Combining many jigdo-managed images into one</H3>
-    <P>It is also no problem to combine data from several sources that use
-     jigdo. For example, if of five different and unrelated servers each
-     one distributes a different CD image via jigdo, you can create a
-     customized DVD image that contains the data from all these CDs. When
-     people use <B>jigdo</B> to download your image, the individual files
-     on the DVD are fetched from the same sources as the original CDs.</P>
-    <P>Consequently, even though you will be distributing a 3.2GB file via
-     your web space, the actual amount of data that is stored on your
-     server will only be in the order of several MBs.</P></DIV></DIV>
-  <DIV><A NAME="BUGS"></A>
-   <H2>BUGS</H2>
-   <P>For certain contents of one of the input files, most notably a
-    sequence of zero bytes longer than <CODE>--min-length</CODE> at the
-    start of the file and an area of zeros preceding the file data in the
-    image, <B>jigdo-file make-template</B> may fail to find the file in the
-    image. Unfortunately, this restriction cannot be avoided because the
-    program could become very slow otherwise. If you use the <CODE
-    >--debug</CODE> option, all instances of <B>jigdo-file</B> discarding
-    possible matches are indicated by lines containing the word `<TT
-    >DROPPED</TT>'.</P>
-   <P>In fact, not only all-zeroes files trigger this behaviour, but also
-    files which contain at their start a long sequence of short identical
-    strings. For example, both a file containing only `<TT>a</TT>'
-    characters and one containing `<TT>abcabcabcabc</TT>...' are
-    problematic.</P></DIV>
-  <DIV><A NAME="SEEALSO"></A>
-   <H2>SEE ALSO</H2>
-   <P> <SPAN><SPAN>jigdo</SPAN>(1)</SPAN> (NOT YET IMPLEMENTED), <SPAN
-    ><SPAN>jigdo-lite</SPAN>(1)</SPAN>, <SPAN><SPAN>jigdo-mirror</SPAN
-    >(1)</SPAN>, <SPAN><SPAN>split</SPAN>(1)</SPAN> (or `<B>info split</B
-    >'), <SPAN><SPAN>find</SPAN>(1)</SPAN> (or `<B>info find</B>'), <SPAN
-    ><SPAN>mkisofs</SPAN>(1)</SPAN>, <SPAN><SPAN>md5sum</SPAN>(1)</SPAN>
-    </P></DIV>
-  <DIV><A NAME="AUTHOR"></A>
-   <H2>AUTHOR</H2>
-   <P><A HREF="http://atterer.org/jigdo/" TARGET="_top">Jigsaw Download</A
-    > was written by Richard Atterer <CODE>&#60;<A HREF="mailto:jigdo
-    atterer.org">jigdo atterer.org</A>&#62;</CODE>, to make downloading of
-    CD ROM images for the Debian Linux distribution more convenient.</P
-   ></DIV>
- </BODY>
-</HTML>
diff --git a/doc/jigdo-lite.1 b/doc/jigdo-lite.1
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index cbf1952..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,67 +0,0 @@
-.\" This manpage has been automatically generated by docbook2man 
-.\" from a DocBook document. This tool can be found at:
-.\" <http://shell.ipoline.com/~elmert/comp/docbook2X/> 
-.\" Please send any bug reports, improvements, comments, patches, 
-.\" etc. to Steve Cheng <steve@ggi-project.org>.
-.TH "JIGDO-LITE" "1" "May 04, 2002" "" ""
-
-.SH NAME
-jigdo-lite \- Download jigdo files using wget
-.SH SYNOPSIS
-
-\fBjigdo-lite\fR [ \fBURL\fR ]
-
-.SH "DESCRIPTION"
-.PP
-See \fBjigdo-file\fR(1) for an introduction to
-Jigsaw Download.
-.PP
-Given the URL of a `\fI\&.jigdo\fR\&' file,
-\fBjigdo-lite\fR downloads the large file (e.g. a CD
-image) that has been made available through that URL.
-\fBwget\fR(1) is used to download the necessary
-pieces of administrative data (contained in the
-`\fI\&.jigdo\fR\&' file and a corresponding
-`\fI\&.template\fR\&' file) as well as the many pieces
-that the large file is made from. The
-\fBjigdo-file\fR(1) utility is used to reconstruct the
-large file from the pieces.
-.PP
-`\fI\&.jigdo\fR\&' files that contain references
-to Debian mirrors are treated specially: When such a file is
-recognized, you are asked to select one mirror out of a list of
-all Debian mirrors.
-.PP
-If \fBURL\fR is not given on the command line,
-the script prompts for a location to download the
-`\fI\&.jigdo\fR\&' file from. The following command
-line options are recognized:
-.TP
-\fB-h --help\fR
-Output short summary of command syntax.
-.TP
-\fB-v --version\fR
-Output version number.
-.TP
-\fB--scan \fIFILES\fB\fR
-Do not ask for "Files to scan", use this path.
-.TP
-\fB--noask\fR
-Do not ask any questions, instead behave as if the
-user had pressed Return at all prompts. This can be useful
-when running \fBjigdo-lite\fR from cron jobs or
-in other non-interactive environments.
-.SH "SEE ALSO"
-.PP
-\fBjigdo-file\fR(1),
-\fBjigdo-mirror\fR(1),
-\fBwget\fR(1) (or `\fBinfo wget\fR\&')
-.PP
-CD images for Debian Linux can be downloaded with
-jigdo <URL:http://www.debian.org/CD/jigdo-cd/>\&.
-.SH "AUTHOR"
-.PP
-Jigsaw
-Download <URL:http://atterer.org/jigdo/> was written by Richard Atterer
-<jigdo atterer.org>, to make downloading of CD ROM
-images for the Debian Linux distribution more convenient.
diff --git a/doc/jigdo-lite.html b/doc/jigdo-lite.html
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index e46c681..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,68 +0,0 @@
-<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01
-Transitional//EN""http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/loose.dtd">
-<HTML>
- <HEAD>
-  <TITLE>jigdo-lite</TITLE><META NAME="GENERATOR" CONTENT="Modular DocBook
-  HTML Stylesheet Version 1.79"></HEAD>
- <BODY CLASS="REFENTRY" BGCOLOR="#FFFFFF" TEXT="#000000" LINK="#0000FF"
-  VLINK="#840084" ALINK="#0000FF">
-  <H1><A NAME="AEN1"></A>jigdo-lite</H1>
-  <DIV><A NAME="AEN14"></A>
-   <H2>Name</H2>jigdo-lite&nbsp;--&nbsp;Download jigdo files using
-   wget</DIV>
-  <DIV><A NAME="AEN17"></A>
-   <H2>Synopsis</H2>
-   <P><B>jigdo-lite</B> [URL]</P></DIV>
-  <DIV><A NAME="DESCRIPTION"></A>
-   <H2>DESCRIPTION</H2>
-   <P>See <SPAN><SPAN>jigdo-file</SPAN>(1)</SPAN> for an introduction to
-    Jigsaw Download.</P>
-   <P>Given the URL of a `<TT>.jigdo</TT>' file, <B>jigdo-lite</B>
-    downloads the large file (e.g. a CD image) that has been made available
-    through that URL. <SPAN><SPAN>wget</SPAN>(1)</SPAN> is used to download
-    the necessary pieces of administrative data (contained in the `<TT
-    >.jigdo</TT>' file and a corresponding `<TT>.template</TT>' file) as
-    well as the many pieces that the large file is made from. The <SPAN
-    ><SPAN>jigdo-file</SPAN>(1)</SPAN> utility is used to reconstruct the
-    large file from the pieces.</P>
-   <P>`<TT>.jigdo</TT>' files that contain references to Debian mirrors are
-    treated specially: When such a file is recognized, you are asked to
-    select one mirror out of a list of all Debian mirrors.</P>
-   <P>If <CODE>URL</CODE> is not given on the command line, the script
-    prompts for a location to download the `<TT>.jigdo</TT>' file from. The
-    following command line options are recognized:</P>
-   <P></P>
-   <DIV>
-    <DL>
-     <DT><CODE>-h</CODE> <CODE>--help</CODE></DT>
-     <DD>
-      <P>Output short summary of command syntax.</P></DD>
-     <DT><CODE>-v</CODE> <CODE>--version</CODE></DT>
-     <DD>
-      <P>Output version number.</P></DD>
-     <DT><CODE>--scan</CODE> <TT><I>FILES</I></TT></DT>
-     <DD>
-      <P>Do not ask for "Files to scan", use this path.</P></DD>
-     <DT><CODE>--noask</CODE></DT>
-     <DD>
-      <P>Do not ask any questions, instead behave as if the user had
-       pressed Return at all prompts. This can be useful when running <B
-       >jigdo-lite</B> from cron jobs or in other non-interactive
-       environments.</P></DD></DL></DIV></DIV>
-  <DIV><A NAME="SEEALSO"></A>
-   <H2>SEE ALSO</H2>
-   <P> <SPAN><SPAN>jigdo-file</SPAN>(1)</SPAN>, <SPAN><SPAN
-    >jigdo-mirror</SPAN>(1)</SPAN>, <SPAN><SPAN>wget</SPAN>(1)</SPAN> (or
-    `<B>info wget</B>') </P>
-   <P>CD images for Debian Linux can be <A
-    HREF="http://www.debian.org/CD/jigdo-cd/" TARGET="_top">downloaded with
-    jigdo</A>.</P></DIV>
-  <DIV><A NAME="AUTHOR"></A>
-   <H2>AUTHOR</H2>
-   <P><A HREF="http://atterer.org/jigdo/" TARGET="_top">Jigsaw Download</A
-    > was written by Richard Atterer <CODE>&#60;<A HREF="mailto:jigdo
-    atterer.org">jigdo atterer.org</A>&#62;</CODE>, to make downloading of
-    CD ROM images for the Debian Linux distribution more convenient.</P
-   ></DIV>
- </BODY>
-</HTML>
diff --git a/doc/jigdo-mirror.1 b/doc/jigdo-mirror.1
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index b759bd0..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,62 +0,0 @@
-.\" This manpage has been automatically generated by docbook2man 
-.\" from a DocBook document. This tool can be found at:
-.\" <http://shell.ipoline.com/~elmert/comp/docbook2X/> 
-.\" Please send any bug reports, improvements, comments, patches, 
-.\" etc. to Steve Cheng <steve@ggi-project.org>.
-.TH "JIGDO-MIRROR" "1" "19 May 2006" "" ""
-
-.SH NAME
-jigdo-mirror \- Maintain a mirror of images offered with jigdo
-.SH SYNOPSIS
-
-\fBjigdo-mirror\fR [ \fBconfig-file\fR ]
-
-.SH "DESCRIPTION"
-.PP
-See \fBjigdo-file\fR(1) for an introduction to
-Jigsaw Download.
-.PP
-\fBjigdo-mirror\fR is a script intended for
-people who want to offer direct HTTP or FTP downloads of files for
-which only the jigdo and template files are available.
-.PP
-As the first step of using \fBjigdo-mirror\fR,
-you need to set up normal HTTP/FTP/rsync mirroring both of the
-`\fI\&.jigdo\fR\&'/`\fI\&.template\fR\&'
-files and of the parts that are needed for the reconstruction of
-the images. For example, in the case that you want to mirror
-Debian CD images with \fBjigdo-mirror\fR, you need a
-mirror of the
-`\fI\&.jigdo\fR\&'/`\fI\&.template\fR\&'
-files and a Debian mirror on the local machine.
-.PP
-At regular intervals (preferably immediately after the
-normal mirroring has finished), schedule a run of
-\fBjigdo-mirror\fR\&. It will search through a given
-directory for any `\fI\&.jigdo\fR\&' files and attempt
-to create all images offered by each file.
-.PP
-The script requires you to set a number of variables -
-please refer to the start of
-\fI/usr/bin/jigdo-mirror\fR for a description of
-each of them. Since \fI/usr/bin/jigdo-mirror\fR
-will be overwritten whenever you upgrade
-\fBjigdo-mirror\fR, it is highly recommended
-\fBnot\fR to change the settings directly in this
-script. Instead, personal settings should be saved in a file
-called \fI\&.jigdo-mirror\fR in your home directory,
-or in a different file whose name is then passed to the script as
-its first (and only) command line argument.
-.SH "SEE ALSO"
-.PP
-\fBjigdo-file\fR(1),
-\fBjigdo-lite\fR(1)
-.PP
-CD images for Debian Linux can be downloaded with
-jigdo <URL:http://www.debian.org/CD/jigdo-cd/>\&.
-.SH "AUTHOR"
-.PP
-Jigsaw
-Download <URL:http://atterer.org/jigdo/> was written by Richard Atterer
-<jigdo atterer.org>, to make downloading of CD ROM
-images for the Debian Linux distribution more convenient.
diff --git a/doc/jigdo-mirror.html b/doc/jigdo-mirror.html
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index e382ee5..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,58 +0,0 @@
-<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01
-Transitional//EN""http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/loose.dtd">
-<HTML>
- <HEAD>
-  <TITLE>jigdo-mirror</TITLE><META NAME="GENERATOR" CONTENT="Modular
-  DocBook HTML Stylesheet Version 1.79"></HEAD>
- <BODY CLASS="REFENTRY" BGCOLOR="#FFFFFF" TEXT="#000000" LINK="#0000FF"
-  VLINK="#840084" ALINK="#0000FF">
-  <H1><A NAME="AEN1"></A>jigdo-mirror</H1>
-  <DIV><A NAME="AEN14"></A>
-   <H2>Name</H2>jigdo-mirror&nbsp;--&nbsp;Maintain a mirror of images
-   offered with jigdo</DIV>
-  <DIV><A NAME="AEN17"></A>
-   <H2>Synopsis</H2>
-   <P><B>jigdo-mirror</B> [config-file]</P></DIV>
-  <DIV><A NAME="DESCRIPTION"></A>
-   <H2>DESCRIPTION</H2>
-   <P>See <SPAN><SPAN>jigdo-file</SPAN>(1)</SPAN> for an introduction to
-    Jigsaw Download.</P>
-   <P><B>jigdo-mirror</B> is a script intended for people who want to offer
-    direct HTTP or FTP downloads of files for which only the jigdo and
-    template files are available.</P>
-   <P>As the first step of using <B>jigdo-mirror</B>, you need to set up
-    normal HTTP/FTP/rsync mirroring both of the `<TT>.jigdo</TT>'/`<TT
-    >.template</TT>' files and of the parts that are needed for the
-    reconstruction of the images. For example, in the case that you want to
-    mirror Debian CD images with <B>jigdo-mirror</B>, you need a mirror of
-    the `<TT>.jigdo</TT>'/`<TT>.template</TT>' files and a Debian mirror on
-    the local machine.</P>
-   <P>At regular intervals (preferably immediately after the normal
-    mirroring has finished), schedule a run of <B>jigdo-mirror</B>. It will
-    search through a given directory for any `<TT>.jigdo</TT>' files and
-    attempt to create all images offered by each file.</P>
-   <P>The script requires you to set a number of variables - please refer
-    to the start of <TT>/usr/bin/jigdo-mirror</TT> for a description of
-    each of them. Since <TT>/usr/bin/jigdo-mirror</TT> will be overwritten
-    whenever you upgrade <B>jigdo-mirror</B>, it is highly recommended
-    <SPAN><I>not</I></SPAN> to change the settings directly in this script.
-    Instead, personal settings should be saved in a file called <TT
-    >.jigdo-mirror</TT> in your home directory, or in a different file
-    whose name is then passed to the script as its first (and only) command
-    line argument.</P></DIV>
-  <DIV><A NAME="SEEALSO"></A>
-   <H2>SEE ALSO</H2>
-   <P> <SPAN><SPAN>jigdo-file</SPAN>(1)</SPAN>, <SPAN><SPAN
-    >jigdo-lite</SPAN>(1)</SPAN> </P>
-   <P>CD images for Debian Linux can be <A
-    HREF="http://www.debian.org/CD/jigdo-cd/" TARGET="_top">downloaded with
-    jigdo</A>.</P></DIV>
-  <DIV><A NAME="AUTHOR"></A>
-   <H2>AUTHOR</H2>
-   <P><A HREF="http://atterer.org/jigdo/" TARGET="_top">Jigsaw Download</A
-    > was written by Richard Atterer <CODE>&#60;<A HREF="mailto:jigdo
-    atterer.org">jigdo atterer.org</A>&#62;</CODE>, to make downloading of
-    CD ROM images for the Debian Linux distribution more convenient.</P
-   ></DIV>
- </BODY>
-</HTML>
diff --git a/doc/jigdo.1 b/doc/jigdo.1
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index d7b0b8c..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,35 +0,0 @@
-.\" This manpage has been automatically generated by docbook2man 
-.\" from a DocBook document. This tool can be found at:
-.\" <http://shell.ipoline.com/~elmert/comp/docbook2X/> 
-.\" Please send any bug reports, improvements, comments, patches, 
-.\" etc. to Steve Cheng <steve@ggi-project.org>.
-.TH "JIGDO" "1" "May 05, 2003" "" ""
-
-.SH NAME
-jigdo \- GTK+ download manager.
-.SH SYNOPSIS
-
-\fBjigdo\fR [ \fBOPTIONS\fR ] [ \fBURLS\fR ]
-
-.SH "DESCRIPTION"
-.PP
-BETA version of the jigdo download manager.
-.PP
-This version is not yet capable of processing
-`\fI\&.jigdo\fR\&' files - use \fBjigdo-lite\fR(1) for that.
-.PP
-\fBjigdo\fR is a GTK+ download manager with FTP
-and HTTP 1.1 pipelining support, pausing, continuing and resuming
-of downloads, and automatic guessing of your proxy
-configuration.
-.SH "SEE ALSO"
-.PP
-\fBjigdo-lite\fR(1),
-\fBjigdo-file\fR(1),
-\fBjigdo-mirror\fR(1)
-.SH "AUTHOR"
-.PP
-Jigsaw
-Download <URL:http://atterer.org/jigdo/> was written by Richard Atterer
-<jigdo atterer.org>, to make downloading of CD ROM
-images for the Debian Linux distribution more convenient.
diff --git a/doc/jigdo.html b/doc/jigdo.html
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index c07ce91..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,36 +0,0 @@
-<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01
-Transitional//EN""http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/loose.dtd">
-<HTML>
- <HEAD>
-  <TITLE>jigdo</TITLE><META NAME="GENERATOR" CONTENT="Modular DocBook HTML
-  Stylesheet Version 1.79"></HEAD>
- <BODY CLASS="REFENTRY" BGCOLOR="#FFFFFF" TEXT="#000000" LINK="#0000FF"
-  VLINK="#840084" ALINK="#0000FF">
-  <H1><A NAME="AEN1"></A>jigdo</H1>
-  <DIV><A NAME="AEN14"></A>
-   <H2>Name</H2>jigdo&nbsp;--&nbsp;GTK+ download manager.</DIV>
-  <DIV><A NAME="AEN17"></A>
-   <H2>Synopsis</H2>
-   <P><B>jigdo</B> [OPTIONS] [URLS]</P></DIV>
-  <DIV><A NAME="DESCRIPTION"></A>
-   <H2>DESCRIPTION</H2>
-   <P>BETA version of the jigdo download manager.</P>
-   <P>This version is not yet capable of processing `<TT>.jigdo</TT>' files
-    - use <SPAN><SPAN>jigdo-lite</SPAN>(1)</SPAN> for that.</P>
-   <P><B>jigdo</B> is a GTK+ download manager with FTP and HTTP 1.1
-    pipelining support, pausing, continuing and resuming of downloads, and
-    automatic guessing of your proxy configuration.</P></DIV>
-  <DIV><A NAME="SEEALSO"></A>
-   <H2>SEE ALSO</H2>
-   <P> <SPAN><SPAN>jigdo-lite</SPAN>(1)</SPAN>, <SPAN><SPAN
-    >jigdo-file</SPAN>(1)</SPAN>, <SPAN><SPAN>jigdo-mirror</SPAN>(1)</SPAN
-    > </P></DIV>
-  <DIV><A NAME="AUTHOR"></A>
-   <H2>AUTHOR</H2>
-   <P><A HREF="http://atterer.org/jigdo/" TARGET="_top">Jigsaw Download</A
-    > was written by Richard Atterer <CODE>&#60;<A HREF="mailto:jigdo
-    atterer.org">jigdo atterer.org</A>&#62;</CODE>, to make downloading of
-    CD ROM images for the Debian Linux distribution more convenient.</P
-   ></DIV>
- </BODY>
-</HTML>